How To Deal With A Bad Haircut

How To Deal With A Bad Haircut

Have you ever found yourself leaving the salon with a cut that was not exactly what you wanted or was and now you realize that you made a mistake? Well here are some helpful ways to deal with a bad haircut.

Wash Your Hair

You never really know how a hairstyle looks until you start from scratch and try it yourself. We firmly believe stylists actually go to some special school and develop magical hair powers, which is why we can never make our hair look the same as when it’s freshly cut. Wash it and try to style it yourself to get the best hair possible.

Let Bobby Pins Become A Way Of Life

Even though bobby pins have a way of disappearing before our very eyes (really, though, where do they all go?), you can use the little tools to create some pretty neat hairstyles — no hair tie or hair length necessary.

Try New Styles

Unfortunately, you’re stuck with this cut until your hair grows out. Make the best of it by trying new styles, products or tools. Don’t be afraid to dust off the crimper that’s been hiding under your bathroom cabinet for a decade.

Master The Top Knot

Placing a bun on top of your head is basically the solution to everything. If you still have the length, try to perfect the top knot, messy bun, or the ballerina bun to disguise a less-than-perfect haircut.

Embrace Headbands

Big headbands look great on everyone and can cover up those annoying short layers that simply won’t reach all the way to your bun.

Step Up Your Accessory Game

This is more of a distraction mechanism, but who’s to say your crush won’t notice your chunky necklace or statement earrings before he/she notices your bangs? Also, retail therapy always helps.

Don’t Be Afraid Of Hurting Your Stylist’s Feelings

If you don’t like the cut, tell your stylist. It’s not going to hurt her feelings and she can even learn from your style. In my case, my hairstylist did a great job with the cut, I just didn’t like it! Now we both know to never try bangs again.

Braids Are Best

Braids > everything. If you haven’t mastered French braiding or the fishtail braid yet, now is the time. You can have bangs, layers, or length with a good braid style.

Celebrate The Good Hair Days

As you’re trying new styles or watching your hair grow back out to its norm, remember to remain optimistic. Maybe even get a little too excited about when you love the way your hair looks. Every reason is a good reason to have a mini-dance party.

What is Colombre?

Rainbow hair is awesome. Whether you opt for some sand art hair or a My Little Pony-inspired mane, rocking a head full of color is a super fresh way to switch up your look. However, as amazing as a rainbow-colored head can look, it can also be super high maintenance. Especially if you have naturally dark hair. If you’ve been deterred from trying the trend just for that reason, we have a solution for you. Introducing: colombré.

 

@hair_by_christina | @francesca_beaverhousen

For colombré, rather than lightening the bottom half of the hair to a blond shade, the midshaft to the ends are transformed into a creative color, like blue, pink, purple, or turquoise. It leaves the top half of hair a darker, natural shade with a gradual shift down to creative color. We’ve seen the look sported with a range of colors, and we’ve also seen it with just one – it looks equally as cool either way.

Boldly colored hair is the thing right now! The half-and-half hair dye is definitely still having a moment, along with cool pixelated hair dye and metallic silver hair dye looks. All of them are worth trying, but we love the colombré look the most.

In our personal experience with it, the best part of colombré is how the colored dye continues to look beautiful as it fades. Because the color is mixed into the bottom half of your hair, there’s no root touch-ups to deal with. Plus, a topknot with a pop of color is basically the best thing ever.

If you’ve been thinking about taking the color plunge, colombré could be a great way to jump on the bandwagon. Not only is it a slightly subtler way to try out the look, but it’s also more evenly integrated with your natural locks, making it much less maintenance than a dye job that starts at the roots.

Root Touch Up’s 101

It’s nice having the option to do quick root touch-ups in between your salon visits. Especially when your big interview, hot date, or company gala happens to conveniently fall the week before your next color appointment and you need to camouflage those would-be grey saboteurs STAT.

These days we have plenty of options at our fingertips for color touch-ups from sprays, to crayons, to mascaras, powders and even OTC “root touch-up kits”. It can be confusing to figure out what your best options are. Instead of playing the trial and error game (and trust me, the “error” part can be a nightmare to correct when it comes to your precious locks) let’s review some of the most popular choices we have and determine which ones would be perfect for your specific hair situation and which ones to steer clear of:

DRUG STORE ROOT TOUCH UP KITS:

WHAT IT IS:Usually sold as a one-time-use box set of semi-permanent hair-color paired with an applicator brush for easier regrowth application.

THE GOOD:Only one application is needed and is not formulated to wash away.

THE BAD:Because of the permanency of this type of product, using a root touchup kit that is even half a shade too dark can result in “banding” and other color inconsistencies. If you have a multi-service color regimen (i.e.: base color and highlights), one accidental slip of that applicator brush or faulty sectioning could ruin your highlights or create unsightly spots and uneven color in the hair.

THE BOTTOM LINE:Anything you buy in a box that requires you to mix two or more ingredients together to create a chemical reaction has some sort of permanency in the hair and is a risk that you’ll have to decide for yourself whether or not is worth taking. Being a “Kitchen Beautician” to save a few bucks in between professional services may seem like a good idea, and sometimes it works out just fine… but sometimes it doesn’t. So, buyer beware: Corrective color services require far more work than the usual maintenance regimen, often times racking up a costly bill.

 

HAIR MASCARAS:

WHAT IT IS: Essentially, it’s like mascara- for your roots! These temporary colors can be swiped onto unsightly greys for instant coverage.

THE GOOD:Inexpensive ($8-$12 for a tube that lasts months), easy to apply and shampoos out, therefore will not affect or interfere with your regular salon maintenance regimen.

THE BAD:Many hair mascaras leave a slightly tacky residue anywhere it is applied. Colored residue may wear off on clothing or pillowcases.

THE BOTTOM LINE:This is perfect for any style worn up (ponytails, etc.) but some users are bothered by the texture of the residue when the hair is worn down. This is not the type of product you would want to constantly run your hands through all day.

 

POWDER PALETTES:

WHAT IT IS:They look almost like eyeshadow palettes but contain pressed power and an applicator brush used to disguise roots.

THE GOOD:One great feature of this type of product is the ability to touch up highlights by using a “blonde” powder on dark roots. The light weight power coats the hair seamlessly with no residual texture. Touchup powders are easy to apply and shampoo right out, therefore will not affect or interfere with your regular salon maintenance regimen.

THE BAD:Colored residue may wear off on clothing or pillowcases and dark colored powders may show up on the scalp.

THE BOTTOM LINE:My personal favorite for touching up blonde highlights. Just watch out on a rainy day.

 

MARKERS:

WHAT IT IS:Touch up markers generally contain a temporary dye used to conceal greys in between salon visits.

THE GOOD:Most touchup markers are formulated to shampoo out, so that they do not affect or interfere with your regular salon maintenance regimen. The color is usually weightless & water resistant (must be shampooed out) and are less likely to rub off on clothing or pillowcases.

THE BAD:Markers require a bit more tact to apply. Users are advised to use a comb (usually included) to avoid accidentally coloring their scalp when applying. Touchup markers are generally more expensive than their mascara or powdered counterparts running upwards of $30+.

THE BOTTOM LINE:Great for seamless root touchups but not for highlight touchups. Application may take a little more time and skill. The water resistance is a plus and will withstand light rain or perspiration.

 

AEROSOL SPRAY:

WHAT IT IS: A colored spray for quick and easy grey coverage. The amount of coverage and level of lightness/darkness can be customized by the number of coats.

THE GOOD: The fine, aerosol mist creates seamless coverage and just like the previous three options, touch up aerosols are formulated to shampoo out, so that they cause no harm to or interfere with your regular salon maintenance regimen. The color is usually weightless and water resistant (must be shampooed out) and less likely to rub off on clothing or pillowcases.

THE BAD: Not recommended for pulled back styles (i.e.: ponytails) since it’s difficult (however not impossible if you’re crafty enough) to spray near the hairline without getting a weird looking tan on your forehead 😉

THE BOTTOM LINE: These are easy to apply AND water resistant (most brands are but be sure to check the label). They’re great for styles worn down, but not recommended for pulled back styles.

 

Talk Options with Your Colorist:

If you’re finding yourself in need of touching up your own roots more often than not, then it may be time to discuss other color options with your colorist. Are you an “every 5-weeker”? Try switching to every 4 weeks instead. It’s amazing the difference one week can make. If going to the salon more frequently is not going to fly with your budget, then consider changing your color. If your hair is 60% grey or more, consider going with a lighter base so there is less contrast when your roots grow in. If you’re a heavily highlighted blonde, consider switching from heavy highlights to soft, hand-painted balayage for a softer, less apparent regrowth line. Not in favor of changing your color? If your colorist works in a busy salon with colleagues at different price levels, ask if it would be okay to alternate between your beloved colorist and a lower priced associate so that you can come in more frequently and still get the same consistent color formula. Any good colorist will be more than happy to work with you to find a perfect regimen that fits your tastes, lifestyle and budget. Remember, the key to great hair and a happy client/stylist relationship is clear communication.