How To Hide Your Bangs

There’s no denying that bangs give you a unique style, and when cut properly, they frame any face beautifully. However, they are not for everyone:

THEY ARE HIGH MAINTENANCE

Bangs involve getting regular trims every few weeks and styling your hair every single day. Not an ideal look for someone that wants to get ready for work in under 15 minutes.

THEY ARE DIFFICULT TO STYLE

When you have bangs, you can’t wake up with your second-day hair and just leave the house looking cute. Most people’s bangs don’t naturally fall the way we want them to, which means you need to blow dry them or straighten them every day. Also, they never look quite as lovely as when you leave the salon after the first chop.

THEY TAKE FOREVER TO GROW OUT

Human hair grows approximately half an inch every month, but with bangs, the growing out phase seems so much longer.

 

Here are some easy ways to style your hair while you wait for your bangs to grow out.

Bobby Pins: Create a middle part and pin your bangs to the side with bobby pins. Clips are in right now, so you’ll look on-trend wearing bobby pins at the side of your head.

Tie a chic scarf around your head: Take a cue from Blair Waldorf and tie a cute silk scarf around your head and tuck your bangs underneath the scarf.

Curl them: If you have a few minutes to spare, curl your hair. When you curl your bangs, make sure to curl them away from your face. This way, they will blend in with the rest of your hair, and they won’t fall in your face.

Braid them: Create a middle or side part and braid your bangs on both sides. Then, pin the braids to the side of your head with bobby pins. You’ll end up with cute boho looking hair.

High bun: The high bun is one of the most effortless ways to hide your bangs. Pull all your hair (including the bangs) on top of your head. Twist your hair and wrap it around into a bun. Tame any loose pieces of hair with bobby pins.

 

TIP: Remember, getting your haircut to reshape your fringe is a key part of the growing out phase. Although the prospect of cutting your bangs before they’ve grown out seems a bit daunting, a good stylist will be able to cut your hair in a way that will make your bangs blend in as they grow out.

Beard Grooming Tips

Beard grooming has never been so easy: These eight beard care tricks will keep your facial hair looking resplendent.

  1. First and Foremost, Be Patient

A truly epic beard is the product of self-restraint. When you first start growing, resist the urge to trim or style, and leave it untouched for the first 4-6 weeks. This will allow the hairs to grow in evenly (some grow faster than others), and help you pick a style that suits its length and thickness.

  1. Match Your Beard to Your Face Shape

Like any wild animal, a beard should be in-tune with its surrounding environment. Choose a final style that complements your face shape. Your beard will look better, and so will you.

  1. Know How (and When) to Trim

Pruning is essential to a well-groomed beard—even if you plan on growing it out. Invest in a quality trimmer, and find the right technique to suit your master plan.

  1. Wash It Regularly

This is especially important in the early stages of growth, especially since trapped food and skin cells can exacerbate the itchiness. It’s not just about the hair, but also the skin underneath. Washing and conditioning your beard is the most important step in caring for it. Scrub your beard several times each week with a specialized cleanser, then gently pat it dry: An overzealous toweling can lead to frizz and split ends.

  1. Love Thy Beard Oil

Beard oils can be tricky. Some are too heavy. Some are too shiny. Some feel dry. Try as many as possible. You will know when it’s the one.

  1. Learn to Train Your Beard

A regular trim will maintain your chosen shape, but it’s not the only way to keep your beard in line. A daily rubdown with a comb or beard brush will wrangle stubborn hairs, training them to grow in a downward direction.

  1. Don’t Forget the Mustache

Unless you’ve chosen a chinstrap—and we really hope you didn’t—growing an epic beard also means growing a mustache. You can keep your mustache looking pretty neat with tiny trims every three to four days to keep stray hairs at bay. Focus on the area around your philtrum (the area under your nose) with a pair of grooming scissors, and keep it naturally sculpted with a medium-hold wax.

  1. Fuel Up

You can’t build a house without bricks, and the same applies to facial hair. Your beard is made from protein and fat, but it’s also heavily reliant on Vitamins B5, B3, and B9. That means lean meats, nuts, egg yolks, milk, and plenty of leafy greens.

Hair Developer 101

An important part of coloring your hair yourself is figuring out what volume developer you should use. Developer, also known as activator or even peroxide for short, is mixed with bleach or dye to lighten or color hair. It’s a creamy product that contains hydrogen peroxide, and the amount of hydrogen peroxide is what determines developer volume.

When you buy box dye, there is usually two bottles one of them being hair dye and the other developer. Alternatively, you can buy hair dye (or bleach) and developer separately, and choose what volume developer you should use based on your hair condition, hair history and desired result. Guess which option will give you the best results when dying or bleaching your hair?

 

What Does Hair Developer Do?

In order to figure out what volume developer to use you need to first understand what hair developer does. Developers are called activators, and without them hair dye would have absolutely no effect. Developer helps the color penetrate the hair shaft and become permanent. Hydrogen peroxide developer lifts the cuticle layer of the hair and depending on the strength of the activator the cuticle will lift more or less.

Hair developer levels refer to their oxidizing potential, or how much hydrogen peroxide they have. Most bleach and hair color formulas use developer at either 10, 20, 30 or in some cases 40.

Depending on the strength of the developer it can also lift the hair color level a bit. This is why even after removing permanent hair color using color removal products the hair underneath will be lighter than your original virgin hair color.

 

What Volume Developer Should I Use

The volume developer that you should use depends on the results you want to achieve.

With hair dye low volume developer is enough to lift the hair cuticle just enough for pigment to slip inside, but when bleaching your hair, you’ll need a higher volume developer. This is because you need to open the cuticle enough to allow for the natural color pigment to be removed from your hair.

Hair developer damages hair, as it opens the cuticle. So always use as low volume a developer as you can get away with provided it gives you the desired results.

 

Use 10 Volume Developer

If you are applying permanent, no-lift hair color. It won’t lift your base hair color significantly, so you should use it when you want to add a tone or tint to the hair, but keeping it at the same color level. Many toners work with 10 volume developer as it’s the least damaging to the hair and all you want is to deposit a tone to cancel unwanted color in your hair. 10 volume developer is only used to open the hair cuticle layer so the color molecules can deposit in the cortex for long term results.

 

Use 20 Volume Developer

When you want to achieve a lift of one or two levels of hair color or if you have more than 50% grey hair you will need to use 20 volume developer for 100% gray coverage with permanent hair dye. Less than that and you may be able to get away with 10 volume developer, and your grey hair will look like highlights.

You can use 20 volume developer with bleach to lighten hair that is naturally blonde in a gentler fashion.

 

Use 30 Volume Developer

30 volume developer allows you to lighten the hair while coloring by two or three levels, and allows more pigment to embed into the hair shaft. If your hair is not very damaged and you want a lighter and more long-lasting color, 30 volume developer can be a great option. If your hair is low porosity hair you may find that 30 volume developer works better as your hair is naturally more resistant to color.

30 volume developer can be used with bleach to lighten light to medium brown hair.

 

Use 40 Volume Developer

When you are looking to create highlights without bleach using high-lift hair color. This is because it will lift your hair up to four shades. If you are bleaching dark brown or black hair you may also need to use 40 volume developer, but keep in mind that this will be the most damaging for hair. It has 12% peroxide, and that can cause burns on sensitive scalps.

If you are bleaching your hair at home it is much better and safer to do several rounds of bleaching with 30 or even 20 volume developer, and use loads of conditioning treatments and protein builders in between.

 

A Word About 50 Volume Developer

50 volume developer and higher will burn your hair, destroy your hair and generally cause a huge mess. If you really need to lift your hair a lot, use Olaplex or a similar bond builder and possibly several bleaching sessions. Slow and steady wins the race, you don’t want to have a chemically burnt haircut. Always keep the condition of your hair, and your scalp, at the top of your mind.

 

Using Hair Dye Without Developer

You can use hair dye without developer in some cases, but the results won’t be as permanent as with permanent hair dye. Not all dyes are designed to be used with developer!

How To Detangle Matted Hair & Prevent It From Happening Again

Matted hair is the combination of attached and shed hairs entwined in clumps or web-like tangles. They are more severe than regular tangles.

How does it happen?

Matted hair occurs when it has not been combed to remove shed hairs. Loose hairs can knot several times around attached hair, create a tangle, and lead to matting if not removed. Some people are just prone to knotting while other may be suffering from a damaged hair cuticle, causing more friction from the lifted cuticles.

Does it have to be cut out?

No, matted hair can be successfully detangled without cutting the hair. It takes patience, work, and the right tools, but it can be accomplished and end up saving your strands and your nerves from being shot.

How to detangle it

While some may decide to seek a professional (hair stylist) to fix their matted hair, it can be done at home with a few tools and some serious patience.

 

STEP 1: DAMPEN HAIR

Dampen your hair with a spray bottle of water, or briefly holding it under a shower or sink at low water pressure. Most hair treatments are meant to be applied to damp hair, but if you let the hair become dripping wet, it may be more susceptible to breakage.

 

STEP 2: LOOSEN

Loosen the matted strands by saturating hair with a good detangler, oil, or moisturizing conditioner but never a shampoo and water only. This is not the time to skimp so really saturate it. Deep conditioners are great at restoring moisture to your hair and making them easier to untangle, while detangling conditioners are meant specifically to add more slip to your hair.

Coconut oil, olive oil, or Moroccan argan oil can be used instead, and may be especially useful for textured hair. If you dislike the feel of oil in your hair, you can try a hair detangling spray.

If using ordinary conditioner, it will finish moisturizing your hair within a few minutes. Coconut oil and similar oils should be left in for at least 30 minutes for maximum effect, but no longer than 2 hours.Deep conditioners vary as shown on the packaging instructions, but are typically left in for at least an hour, and may be left in overnight for extreme cases.

 

STEP 3: PULL APART THE EASIEST KNOTS WITH YOUR FINGERS

Once the hair treatment has had time to take effect, attempt to gently pull apart the tangled sections of your hair. Small knots or loose mats can sometimes be pulled into smaller, separate tangles from the root side of the knot, nearer to your scalp.

 

STEP 4: COMBING

A comb with sturdy, widely spaced teeth is essential for combing out severe tangles. Fine combs and brushes are likely to meet too much resistance, forcing you to either pull out clumps of hair, or stop brushing.

Always comb tangled hair starting near the ends. Place the comb a few inches (several centimeters) from the end of the tangled hair, and brush downward. Repeat until that section of hair is free of tangles, then move the comb slightly higher up. Repeat until the entire length of your hair is combed. For long or thick, severely matted hair, this may take an hour or more.

If you have a sensitive scalp, hold a section of your hair as you brush it. Grasp a portion of hair about the thickness of a marker or glue stick between your fingers, and give it a half-twist to keep the comb from pulling directly on your scalp. Comb this portion of hair beneath your hand, moving your grip higher once the hair below it is successfully untangled.

If a mat of hair refuses to come apart despite all your efforts, you may need to thin it out. Open a pair of scissors and hold your hair tight with your other hand. Run the bottom blade of the scissors along the underside of the mat, then gently tug at your hair to remove loose strands.

Use a wide-toothed comb until the severe mats and tangles have been straightened out. Switch to a fine-toothed comb or a brush to remove any small knots that may remain.

There will be significant shedding so do not panic and remember we lose on average 100 hairs a day, and since the hair is matted those shed hairs are locked in and need removal.

 

STEP 5: RINSE OUT YOUR HAIR

Rinse out any hair treatments completely once your hair is untangled. If you have tightly coiled hair, and the severe mats have separated enough to allow you to part your hair, clip each section of hair to keep them separate, and rinse one at a time.

HOW TO KEEP HAIR FROM MATTING:

 

  • Do detangle regularly to decrease the chances of it occurring, especially if you are prone to matting
  • Do not put off detangling, as it may turn into a more tedious and damaging detangling session or matting
  • Do regular protein treatments to fill the gaps in damaged cuticles, as this will decrease friction, tangles, and matting
  • Do not keep extensions in any longer than advised