DIY Oils For Gray Hair

Discovering your first gray hair can be almost as intense as dealing with heartbreak. Your life seems to slow down around you as you stare at that first white strand of hair that sprouted out where a beautiful colored one used to sit.

Dealing with grays is something all of us will have to do eventually. If you want to slow down the graying process and treat your hair to some homemade TLC, We’ve compiled a list of some excellent DIY hair oils that can help you eliminate gray hair naturally.

 

Amla Powder & Coconut Oil

You Will Need:

  • 2 teaspoons Amla Powder
  • 3 tablespoons Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Method:

  1. Mix the ingredients in a small saucepan and heat until the powder starts to char.
  2. Let the oil cool until it is warm enough to touch.
  3. Apply the oil on your scalp and hair. Massage your scalp for a few minutes.
  4. Leave the oil in for at least an hour. You can also leave it in overnight.
  5. Wash off with shampoo and then condition.
  6. Repeat this 2-3 times a week.

Precautions:

  • Handle the hot oil with care as it will be extremely hot.
  • Do not heat the oil past 350 degrees Fahrenheit as this will cause it to lose its nutritional value.

Benefits:

Amla contains high amounts of vitamin C which is essential for healthy hair growth, owing to its collagen-boosting abilities. It also contains antioxidants that keep the hair follicles healthy by fighting away damage causing factors. A healthy follicle is better equipped at producing healthy and pigmented hair.

 

Curry Leaves & Coconut Oil

You Will Need:

  • A handful of Curry Leaves
  • 3 tablespoons Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Method:

  1. Heat the curry leaves and coconut oil in a small saucepan until you see a black residue forming.
  2. Turn off the flame and let the oil cool.
  3. Apply the oil to your scalp and hair.
  4. Massage your scalp well and leave the oil in for at least an hour.
  5. Wash with shampoo and then condition.
  6. Repeat this 2-3 times a week.

Precautions:

  • Stand away from the oil while you heat it as the moisture from the curry leaves may cause it to splutter.
  • Let the oil cool before you touch it to avoid burns.
  • Do not heat the oil past 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Benefits:

Curry leaves help restore melanin, the pigment that gives your hair its natural color, in the hair follicles. It is also rich in vitamin B which is vital for hair growth. The mixture of curry leaves and coconut oil for grey hair makes your hair strong and restores elasticity.

 

Coconut Oil & lemon

You Will Need:

  • 2 teaspoons Lemon Juice
  • 2 tablespoons Cold-Pressed Coconut Oil

Method:

  1. Heat the coconut oil for about a minute until it is warm.
  2. To the oil add the lemon juice and start applying it to your scalp and hair.
  3. Leave it in for 30 minutes.
  4. Shampoo and condition.
  5. Repeat this twice a week.

Precautions:

  • Do not overheat the coconut oil.

Benefits:

Lemons are rich in vitamins B, C, and phosphorus. These vitamins and mineral are vital for maintaining the health of the pigment cells that are present in your hair follicles. While lemon juice keeps your follicles healthy, coconut oil provides them with nourishment to produce healthy, pigmented hair.

 

Mustard Oil & Castor oil

You Will Need:

  • 1 tablespoon Castor Oil
  • 2 tablespoons Mustard Oil

Method:

  1. Combine the oils and heat them for a few seconds until they’re warm.
  2. Apply the warm oil to your scalp and hair.
  3. Massage your scalp for 10 minutes and let the oil sit for an additional 45 minutes.
  4. Wash your hair thoroughly with shampoo and then condition.
  5. Repeat this 2-3 times a week.

Precautions:

  • Do not overheat the oils you need it be slightly above room temperature.

Benefits:

Mustard oil contains zinc, calcium, iron, magnesium, and selenium. It is a rich source of minerals that keeps your scalp nourished while the high protein content of castor oil repairs and prevents damage. Proper nourishment is key is preventing grays. This oil blend will also speed up the rate at which your hair grows and improves hair health in terms of shine, smoothness, and strength.

 

Sesame Oil Blend

You Will Need:

  • 100mL Sesame Oil
  • 100mL Carrot Juice
  • 50g Fenugreek Seed Powder

Method:

  1. Combine all the ingredients in a bottle and shake to mix them.
  2. Leave the bottle out in the sun for 21 days.
  3. Shake the bottle and pour 2-3 tablespoons of the oil blend into a bowl for use.
  4. Apply the oil blend all over your scalp and hair and massage for 10-15 minutes.
  5. Shampoo and condition your hair.
  6. Repeat this before every wash for at least 3 months to see results.

Precautions:

  • Prepare batches well in advance so that you don’t run out of the oil blend before the next batch is ready.
  • Store in a cool, dry place

Benefits:

This sesame oil and carrot juice remedy is gaining a lot of popularity as a miracle cure for grays. Sesame oil has been known for a long time as an effective treatment for premature graying. It also helps darken the color of your hair.

 

Black Seed & Olive Oil

You Will Need:

  • 1 tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 1 tablespoon Black Seed Oil

Method:

  1. Mix the two oils in a bowl.
  2. Massage it into your scalp and apply the rest of the oil all through your hair.
  3. Leave it in for an hour and then wash the oil blend out with warm water.
  4. Repeat this every day.
  5. Precautions
  6. After the first week only use the oil blend thrice in a week as washing your hair every day will strip away its natural oils.

Precautions:

  • After the first week only use the oil blend thrice in a week as washing your hair every day will strip away its natural oils.

Benefits:

This black seed and olive oil combination has been in use for thousands of years to treat gray hair. Not only does this oil blend slow down the graying process, but it also effectively conditions and nourishes your hair, making it smooth and shiny.

 

Henna & Coconut Oil

You Will Need:

  • A bunch of Henna Leaves
  • 3-4 tablespoons Coconut oil

Method:

  1. Heat the coconut oil until it starts to boil. To this add your henna leaves.
  2. Let the oil heat until it starts to turn brown.
  3. Allow the oil to cool and then apply it to your hair and scalp.
  4. Leave it on for 45 minutes and then wash it off.
  5. Your grays will have turned to a dark shade of brown. Repeat this when the color starts to fade.

Precautions:

  • Stand at a safe distance from the oil while you heat it as it is likely to splutter.

Benefits:

If you have way too many grays, this is the best possible oil blend you could use to color them while giving your hair and follicles the nourishment they need. The penetrative properties of coconut oil will lock the color from henna into the shafts of your hair so that it won’t fade out easily.

 

 

Ref: www.stylecraze.com

How To Hide Your Bangs

There’s no denying that bangs give you a unique style, and when cut properly, they frame any face beautifully. However, they are not for everyone:

THEY ARE HIGH MAINTENANCE

Bangs involve getting regular trims every few weeks and styling your hair every single day. Not an ideal look for someone that wants to get ready for work in under 15 minutes.

THEY ARE DIFFICULT TO STYLE

When you have bangs, you can’t wake up with your second-day hair and just leave the house looking cute. Most people’s bangs don’t naturally fall the way we want them to, which means you need to blow dry them or straighten them every day. Also, they never look quite as lovely as when you leave the salon after the first chop.

THEY TAKE FOREVER TO GROW OUT

Human hair grows approximately half an inch every month, but with bangs, the growing out phase seems so much longer.

 

Here are some easy ways to style your hair while you wait for your bangs to grow out.

Bobby Pins: Create a middle part and pin your bangs to the side with bobby pins. Clips are in right now, so you’ll look on-trend wearing bobby pins at the side of your head.

Tie a chic scarf around your head: Take a cue from Blair Waldorf and tie a cute silk scarf around your head and tuck your bangs underneath the scarf.

Curl them: If you have a few minutes to spare, curl your hair. When you curl your bangs, make sure to curl them away from your face. This way, they will blend in with the rest of your hair, and they won’t fall in your face.

Braid them: Create a middle or side part and braid your bangs on both sides. Then, pin the braids to the side of your head with bobby pins. You’ll end up with cute boho looking hair.

High bun: The high bun is one of the most effortless ways to hide your bangs. Pull all your hair (including the bangs) on top of your head. Twist your hair and wrap it around into a bun. Tame any loose pieces of hair with bobby pins.

 

TIP: Remember, getting your haircut to reshape your fringe is a key part of the growing out phase. Although the prospect of cutting your bangs before they’ve grown out seems a bit daunting, a good stylist will be able to cut your hair in a way that will make your bangs blend in as they grow out.

Beard Grooming Tips

Beard grooming has never been so easy: These eight beard care tricks will keep your facial hair looking resplendent.

  1. First and Foremost, Be Patient

A truly epic beard is the product of self-restraint. When you first start growing, resist the urge to trim or style, and leave it untouched for the first 4-6 weeks. This will allow the hairs to grow in evenly (some grow faster than others), and help you pick a style that suits its length and thickness.

  1. Match Your Beard to Your Face Shape

Like any wild animal, a beard should be in-tune with its surrounding environment. Choose a final style that complements your face shape. Your beard will look better, and so will you.

  1. Know How (and When) to Trim

Pruning is essential to a well-groomed beard—even if you plan on growing it out. Invest in a quality trimmer, and find the right technique to suit your master plan.

  1. Wash It Regularly

This is especially important in the early stages of growth, especially since trapped food and skin cells can exacerbate the itchiness. It’s not just about the hair, but also the skin underneath. Washing and conditioning your beard is the most important step in caring for it. Scrub your beard several times each week with a specialized cleanser, then gently pat it dry: An overzealous toweling can lead to frizz and split ends.

  1. Love Thy Beard Oil

Beard oils can be tricky. Some are too heavy. Some are too shiny. Some feel dry. Try as many as possible. You will know when it’s the one.

  1. Learn to Train Your Beard

A regular trim will maintain your chosen shape, but it’s not the only way to keep your beard in line. A daily rubdown with a comb or beard brush will wrangle stubborn hairs, training them to grow in a downward direction.

  1. Don’t Forget the Mustache

Unless you’ve chosen a chinstrap—and we really hope you didn’t—growing an epic beard also means growing a mustache. You can keep your mustache looking pretty neat with tiny trims every three to four days to keep stray hairs at bay. Focus on the area around your philtrum (the area under your nose) with a pair of grooming scissors, and keep it naturally sculpted with a medium-hold wax.

  1. Fuel Up

You can’t build a house without bricks, and the same applies to facial hair. Your beard is made from protein and fat, but it’s also heavily reliant on Vitamins B5, B3, and B9. That means lean meats, nuts, egg yolks, milk, and plenty of leafy greens.

Hair Developer 101

An important part of coloring your hair yourself is figuring out what volume developer you should use. Developer, also known as activator or even peroxide for short, is mixed with bleach or dye to lighten or color hair. It’s a creamy product that contains hydrogen peroxide, and the amount of hydrogen peroxide is what determines developer volume.

When you buy box dye, there is usually two bottles one of them being hair dye and the other developer. Alternatively, you can buy hair dye (or bleach) and developer separately, and choose what volume developer you should use based on your hair condition, hair history and desired result. Guess which option will give you the best results when dying or bleaching your hair?

 

What Does Hair Developer Do?

In order to figure out what volume developer to use you need to first understand what hair developer does. Developers are called activators, and without them hair dye would have absolutely no effect. Developer helps the color penetrate the hair shaft and become permanent. Hydrogen peroxide developer lifts the cuticle layer of the hair and depending on the strength of the activator the cuticle will lift more or less.

Hair developer levels refer to their oxidizing potential, or how much hydrogen peroxide they have. Most bleach and hair color formulas use developer at either 10, 20, 30 or in some cases 40.

Depending on the strength of the developer it can also lift the hair color level a bit. This is why even after removing permanent hair color using color removal products the hair underneath will be lighter than your original virgin hair color.

 

What Volume Developer Should I Use

The volume developer that you should use depends on the results you want to achieve.

With hair dye low volume developer is enough to lift the hair cuticle just enough for pigment to slip inside, but when bleaching your hair, you’ll need a higher volume developer. This is because you need to open the cuticle enough to allow for the natural color pigment to be removed from your hair.

Hair developer damages hair, as it opens the cuticle. So always use as low volume a developer as you can get away with provided it gives you the desired results.

 

Use 10 Volume Developer

If you are applying permanent, no-lift hair color. It won’t lift your base hair color significantly, so you should use it when you want to add a tone or tint to the hair, but keeping it at the same color level. Many toners work with 10 volume developer as it’s the least damaging to the hair and all you want is to deposit a tone to cancel unwanted color in your hair. 10 volume developer is only used to open the hair cuticle layer so the color molecules can deposit in the cortex for long term results.

 

Use 20 Volume Developer

When you want to achieve a lift of one or two levels of hair color or if you have more than 50% grey hair you will need to use 20 volume developer for 100% gray coverage with permanent hair dye. Less than that and you may be able to get away with 10 volume developer, and your grey hair will look like highlights.

You can use 20 volume developer with bleach to lighten hair that is naturally blonde in a gentler fashion.

 

Use 30 Volume Developer

30 volume developer allows you to lighten the hair while coloring by two or three levels, and allows more pigment to embed into the hair shaft. If your hair is not very damaged and you want a lighter and more long-lasting color, 30 volume developer can be a great option. If your hair is low porosity hair you may find that 30 volume developer works better as your hair is naturally more resistant to color.

30 volume developer can be used with bleach to lighten light to medium brown hair.

 

Use 40 Volume Developer

When you are looking to create highlights without bleach using high-lift hair color. This is because it will lift your hair up to four shades. If you are bleaching dark brown or black hair you may also need to use 40 volume developer, but keep in mind that this will be the most damaging for hair. It has 12% peroxide, and that can cause burns on sensitive scalps.

If you are bleaching your hair at home it is much better and safer to do several rounds of bleaching with 30 or even 20 volume developer, and use loads of conditioning treatments and protein builders in between.

 

A Word About 50 Volume Developer

50 volume developer and higher will burn your hair, destroy your hair and generally cause a huge mess. If you really need to lift your hair a lot, use Olaplex or a similar bond builder and possibly several bleaching sessions. Slow and steady wins the race, you don’t want to have a chemically burnt haircut. Always keep the condition of your hair, and your scalp, at the top of your mind.

 

Using Hair Dye Without Developer

You can use hair dye without developer in some cases, but the results won’t be as permanent as with permanent hair dye. Not all dyes are designed to be used with developer!

How To Detangle Matted Hair & Prevent It From Happening Again

Matted hair is the combination of attached and shed hairs entwined in clumps or web-like tangles. They are more severe than regular tangles.

How does it happen?

Matted hair occurs when it has not been combed to remove shed hairs. Loose hairs can knot several times around attached hair, create a tangle, and lead to matting if not removed. Some people are just prone to knotting while other may be suffering from a damaged hair cuticle, causing more friction from the lifted cuticles.

Does it have to be cut out?

No, matted hair can be successfully detangled without cutting the hair. It takes patience, work, and the right tools, but it can be accomplished and end up saving your strands and your nerves from being shot.

How to detangle it

While some may decide to seek a professional (hair stylist) to fix their matted hair, it can be done at home with a few tools and some serious patience.

 

STEP 1: DAMPEN HAIR

Dampen your hair with a spray bottle of water, or briefly holding it under a shower or sink at low water pressure. Most hair treatments are meant to be applied to damp hair, but if you let the hair become dripping wet, it may be more susceptible to breakage.

 

STEP 2: LOOSEN

Loosen the matted strands by saturating hair with a good detangler, oil, or moisturizing conditioner but never a shampoo and water only. This is not the time to skimp so really saturate it. Deep conditioners are great at restoring moisture to your hair and making them easier to untangle, while detangling conditioners are meant specifically to add more slip to your hair.

Coconut oil, olive oil, or Moroccan argan oil can be used instead, and may be especially useful for textured hair. If you dislike the feel of oil in your hair, you can try a hair detangling spray.

If using ordinary conditioner, it will finish moisturizing your hair within a few minutes. Coconut oil and similar oils should be left in for at least 30 minutes for maximum effect, but no longer than 2 hours.Deep conditioners vary as shown on the packaging instructions, but are typically left in for at least an hour, and may be left in overnight for extreme cases.

 

STEP 3: PULL APART THE EASIEST KNOTS WITH YOUR FINGERS

Once the hair treatment has had time to take effect, attempt to gently pull apart the tangled sections of your hair. Small knots or loose mats can sometimes be pulled into smaller, separate tangles from the root side of the knot, nearer to your scalp.

 

STEP 4: COMBING

A comb with sturdy, widely spaced teeth is essential for combing out severe tangles. Fine combs and brushes are likely to meet too much resistance, forcing you to either pull out clumps of hair, or stop brushing.

Always comb tangled hair starting near the ends. Place the comb a few inches (several centimeters) from the end of the tangled hair, and brush downward. Repeat until that section of hair is free of tangles, then move the comb slightly higher up. Repeat until the entire length of your hair is combed. For long or thick, severely matted hair, this may take an hour or more.

If you have a sensitive scalp, hold a section of your hair as you brush it. Grasp a portion of hair about the thickness of a marker or glue stick between your fingers, and give it a half-twist to keep the comb from pulling directly on your scalp. Comb this portion of hair beneath your hand, moving your grip higher once the hair below it is successfully untangled.

If a mat of hair refuses to come apart despite all your efforts, you may need to thin it out. Open a pair of scissors and hold your hair tight with your other hand. Run the bottom blade of the scissors along the underside of the mat, then gently tug at your hair to remove loose strands.

Use a wide-toothed comb until the severe mats and tangles have been straightened out. Switch to a fine-toothed comb or a brush to remove any small knots that may remain.

There will be significant shedding so do not panic and remember we lose on average 100 hairs a day, and since the hair is matted those shed hairs are locked in and need removal.

 

STEP 5: RINSE OUT YOUR HAIR

Rinse out any hair treatments completely once your hair is untangled. If you have tightly coiled hair, and the severe mats have separated enough to allow you to part your hair, clip each section of hair to keep them separate, and rinse one at a time.

HOW TO KEEP HAIR FROM MATTING:

 

  • Do detangle regularly to decrease the chances of it occurring, especially if you are prone to matting
  • Do not put off detangling, as it may turn into a more tedious and damaging detangling session or matting
  • Do regular protein treatments to fill the gaps in damaged cuticles, as this will decrease friction, tangles, and matting
  • Do not keep extensions in any longer than advised

10 Things You Can Do Right Now To Prevent Winter Hair Damage

During the winter months, cold outside weather combined with dry indoor heat can wreak havoc on your strands, leading to split ends and breakage. That’s right: Breakage isn’t just a summertime sadness. It happens in winter, and to all manner of hair types. In order to have a fabulous mane all year long, there are a few precautions you should take throughout the year.

  1. Shampoo less often to help with itchy, flaky scalp.

Plaques of skin can smother the scalp, not only causing itch and flakes, but smothering growth as well. Shampoo a little less if you can.

 

  1. Switch to an oil-based moisturizer to lock in extra moisture.

Blasts of dry air are not good for any type of hair. The only way to combat it: extra moisture. “Natural, curly, wavy, relaxed, and coiled hair is sensitive to cold weather, when it’s prone to brittle texture, breakage, and split ends,” explains Ron Williams, national educator for Phytospecific, who suggests using a heavier-than-usual oil-based moisturizer that will evaporate more slowly to protect textured hair.

 

  1. Commit to weekly treatments to keep hair hydrated.

Dry air also means all hair textures should focus on weekly hair treatments to replace lost moisture. “Hair dries out in winter from not having enough moisture in the indoor air, which is when a good conditioner comes in handy,” advises James Corbett, owner of James Corbett Studio and global color consultant for Clairol. “Once a week, you should baby your hair: Slather conditioner on and take 30 minutes for the moisture to penetrate into the hair shaft.”

 

  1. Use leave-in conditioner to combat static.

Floating, fine strands are a common occurrence during winter, which Corbett says is a key sign of dryness. Corbett advises that, instead of the static guard/dryer sheet route, be sure hair is hydrated with regular conditioning, then lock it in with a leave-in conditioner.

 

  1. Forgo platinum haircolor for a darker dye this winter.

According to Corbett, this might be a good time to dial down blonde ambition. “Anytime you can switch off is good. Platinum is awesome, but it’s so incredibly damaging for the hair.” He advises leaving the roots a little darker and applying a demi-permanent hue until the weather is kinder. “That way, it washes out, and the process won’t be that detrimental when you’re ready to go back to platinum again.”

 

  1. Cut down on your heat-heavy styling routine.

All that heat and dryness will result in split ends and breakage. Corbett advises avid use of heat protection, including leave-in conditioners, to prevent breakage. Also try protective styles, such as braids, buns, twists, and ponytails, which give hair time off from the heat routine.

 

  1. But never go outside with damp hair to bypass breakage.

Although time is of the essence in the morning, it’s critical to dry hair thoroughly before dashing into the cold. “Anything that’s cold expands, and that’s what can happen with your wet hair shaft in the cold weather, which puts you at risk for breakage and makes your color fade faster,” cautions Corbett. Take the time. Your hair—and your salon bill—will thank you later.

 

  1. Line your winter hat with silk or satin to stop split ends.

Warning: Wool, cotton, and other coarse fabrics can cause split ends and breakage, a tip even more important if you have curls or natural-textured hair. “Always line wool, acrylic, and/or cotton hats with silk or satin,” recommends Williams, who advises going DIY: Buy or use old fabric (like a vintage scarf or silk blouse) to measure and sew into any hat you already own.

Williams recommends curly and natural girls apply an oil-based hair moisturizer prior to hat placement, while Corbett suggests smooth-textured ladies utilize a silk scarf to prolong their blowout. “Place your blowout or style inside a silk scarf underneath your hat to protect your hair. When you arrive at your destination, remove the scarf and your blowout will be in-tact and protected.”

 

  1. Use dry shampoo for volume if your hair has gone limp.

Those with oily hair might find their hair goes extraordinarily limp, particularly when it comes to the dreaded “hat head,” which can ruin your style and your whole day. “You’ll want to shampoo a little more, and condition a little less, especially at the root,” explains Reyman. “Use a good spray or thickening tonic to help build up the style and add volume. Dry shampoos are great for this: they keep the hair fuller and more robust, and expand the hair shaft.”

 

  1. Hydrate hair overnight with an oil or serum.

Dry night air leeches moisture from your skin (hello, night cream!) as well as your hair. Ryan Cotton, hairstylist at Serge Normant at John Frieda Salon, is a proponent of night serums. “It can sometimes create a mess on your pillowcase, but I say designate an old pillowcase for ‘hydration night.’”

Williams advises girls with curls, relaxed, and textured strands hydrate nightly with a light oil high in omega fatty acids, along with an extra measure of added protection. “Always cover your hair with a sleep bonnet or silk scarf to avoid friction. It will also keep moisture levels intact.”

 

Ref: www.self.com

The Ultimate Morning Hair Care Routine

While most women have a go-to morning routine for their skin, what about for your hair? Whatever the style du jour might be, here’s how you can care for your hair on a daily basis.

  1. Use the right brush

It all starts with the right brush for your hair type and condition. Using a brush that’s too harsh, causes frizz or forces you to rip through your hair are all bad ways to start styling. A non-synthetic wide and flat brush is a good option for most hair types, but remember to wash it regularly.

  1. Give your hair a break

If you wore a heavily-styled look yesterday, opt for something looser with less products required today. This will help prevent serious product-buildup in your hair, and give it the time it needs to regain strength after being pulled around and strained.

  1. Don’t grease up

Avoid skincare products getting into the hairline, giving you greasy roots before you even leave the house, by wearing a soft fabric headband when applying your skincare products and makeup. When you move onto your hairstyle, remember to wash your hands.

  1. When to wash

It’s recommended to wash your hair every two/three days to avoid stripping it of its natural oils. If your hair starts to look a little greasy in between washes, spray Morning After Dust at the roots and underneath. Once a week, apply a leave-in conditioner overnight to replenish the hair.

  1. Blow-dry it right

Don’t use the hottest temperature when blow-drying as this can damage and dry out the hair shaft, leaving it weak and prone to breakages. For a natural boost of volume to start your day, blow-dry with your head upside down, then flick upwards and backwards when 90% dry. Always try to avoid drying 100%, your hair will appreciate the little bit of moisture left over.

Applying these (almost) everyday tips to your haircare routine will show your hair that you care for it just as much as you do your skin!

How To Color Your Hair Extensions

01: Don’t Like Your Color? Change It!

If your clip-in human hair extensions aren’t quite the right color for you, it can be massively frustrating. But for the crafty out there, this doesn’t have to be a problem. In fact, just like standard human hair, you can simply dye them a different shade. As long as you’re making your extensions darker or altering the tone (for example, making them redder or cooler,) it’s a simple at-home process.

A word of caution, though: If you want to lighten or highlight your human-hair extensions, consider enlisting the help of a professional hair stylist. You can attempt it, but it’s a trickier, more involved process—one that can damage your expensive investment if done wrong.

Before you begin, double-check that your hair extensions are true human hair. Artificial hair cannot be colored successfully.

 

02: Choose a Color, and Gather Your Supplies

Select a color from a professional hair color and developer line. A boxed color from a drugstore doesn’t give you the option to choose the developer that you will use on your hair extensions, and that’s what you want. A 10-volume developer or a demi-permanent color is best. You can use 20-volume developer if necessary, but avoid 30- and 40-volume developers as they will damage your hair extensions if you’re not careful.

After you’ve purchased your color and developer, gather a few more supplies:

  • Color bowl and brush
  • Hair color gloves
  • Tin foil
  • Plastic wrap
  • Wide-toothed comb
  • Towel

 

03: Organize Your Workspace and Mix Color

If possible, set up your supplies on a large counter or table space with plenty of room to work comfortably. The room should be both warm and well-lit. Spread sheets of tin foil across your work area to prevent staining your workspace from the color.

Following the manufacturer’s directions, prepare your color. Most color is mixed with equal parts color and developer. You’ll need approximately 3–5 ounces of prepared color for your extensions. More color may be necessary for longer extensions. You don’t have to wash your extensions prior to coloring, but you need to comb them through to remove tangles. Then, lay them across the tin foil. Let them dry—don’t color your hair extensions while they are wet or damp.

 

04: Apply The Color

Using gloved hands and a color brush, completely saturate each section of your hair extensions with the color solution. Be sure that the color completely coats both sides of your extensions, from their tops to the very ends. It’s far better to use too much color, rather than not enough. Start at the top of the extension (where the clips are located) moving downward to the ends, following the natural fall of the hair. Applying the color upwards could damage your extensions, and will likely leave your extensions frizzy and disheveled.

 

05: Process The Color

After you’ve applied color to each section of your extensions, loosely cover them with plastic wrap in order to prevent the color from drying out. Allow the color to process at standard room temperature for the amount of time specified on the manufacturer’s directions—typically anywhere from 20 to 40 minutes.

Check a small section of the hair extensions every five to 10 minutes during the processing time by gently rubbing the color off the extension with a paper towel. Reapply the color with your color brush after checking, and remember that hair color when wet appears darker than it does when dry. When the processing has been completed and the color of your extensions is satisfactory, it’s time to rinse out the hair. Fold your tin foil in half for simple transportation to a sink.

 

06: Rinse

Rinse the color from your extensions using cool (not cold) water at low pressure, using your fingers to gently work the excess dye out. It’s important that you allow the water to flow in the direction that the hair naturally falls, from the clipped portion of the extension to the ends. A thorough rinsing should take an absolute minimum of 15–20 minutes. Make sure you remove all the color; if you’re not sure you have, keep rinsing. Follow up by shampooing your extensions with a mild, sulfate-free, moisturizing or color-safe shampoo.

 

07: Comb & Allow To Dry

When you’re sure that your extensions are rinsed completely, lay a towel down on your workspace. Apply a leave-in conditioner to each section of your extensions and comb them gently with your wide-toothed comb. Allow the extensions to air-dry thoroughly (don’t use a blow-drier) before using or styling them, especially if you use any kind of heat tools.

 

Ref: Byride.com

Do The Season Changes Affect Your Hair?

March is one of our favorite times of the year. The flowers start to come out, blossom appears on the trees, and the weather starts getting a little bit warmer. It means one thing: spring has well and truly sprung and summer is a little bit closer. Changing up your wardrobe at this time of the year seems completely normal. But what about the rest of your beauty routine? Does the change in season affect your hair? Changes in your hair texture can really throw your routine off balance. Here are some tips on how to handle troublesome locks when the season is changing and you’re not sure why your hair is too.

Everything from temperature to pollution can contribute to changes in your skin and body. Your hair is included in that. Humidity has a huge impact on the appearance and manageability of your hair. The more humid it is, the more likely it is your hair will frizz.

Many of us have to deal with our hair going frizzy and it can be super annoying. However, it isn’t completely simple. In fact, there is science behind your frizz. Your hair contains bonds called ‘hydrogen bonds’. These are weak bonds that are easily broken by water and then reset upon drying. This is, on the one hand, very handy as you can set your hair into almost any style when you dry it from wet with heated styling tools.

However, hydrogen bonds are not always broken and reset when you want them to be; they are also broken by water in the atmosphere, and subsequently reset themselves into undesirable configurations upon drying. Therefore, in particularly humid seasons like the summer, you are very likely to find your strands kink and frizz progressively throughout the day.

So, why is it that hair tends to get frizzier in the winter? Your hair can also frizz if you wear warm hats. This is down to the water content in sweat! Static hair is also a common winter hair woe.

The changes in season have a pretty fundamental effect on your hair. Shaking up your hair care routine is one way to combat dry, frizzy, or greasy hair. However, there is not a one size fits all cure. uring the summer, when UV rays are at their strongest and you are exposing your hair to more sun, hair tends to become dry and brittle. This is because UV rays act on strands much like bleach. The most obvious symptom of sun exposure is a fading of hair color; UV rays (like bleach) oxidize hair pigment cells (melanin). UV rays can also degrade the protein of your hair, making it more fragile and prone to breakage. Chlorinated and salt water are equally drying and can add to problems.

While summer can wreak havoc on your hair winter brings its own set of problems too. Winter often spells trouble for the scalp. We see many more cases of flaky/itchy scalps in winter than any other season. A flaky scalp can cause extra hair fall, so it is important to address any scalp irritation ASAP.

Dealing with hair and scalp problems can be super annoying when you are at a loss as to how to treat it. However, getting your hair back to its normal, luscious state doesn’t have to be too complicated. In fact, incorporating a new hair regime into your beauty routine really makes you feel like you are getting the self-love you deserve.

We recommend using UV protective products in the summer to shield your hair from sun damage. Your hair can burn just like your skin – you simply cannot feel it. To counteract frizzy hair, we recommend you use lightweight creams or serums that create a barrier between your hair shaft and water in the atmosphere.

Good hair days can leave you feeling (and looking) like the boss that you really are. But by the same token, when your hair just isn’t work for you, looking damaged or getting greasy way too quickly it is really irritating. If you are having some common seasonal problems with your hair here are some tips:

For greasy hair: Wash it. Apply the same thinking to hair/scalp as you do to your face. i.e. If your face were to become greasy, you would cleanse it! You can also use a daily scalp toner containing an astringent ingredient, such as Witch Hazel, to help manage oiliness.

For dry hair: First, find out why your hair is dry in the first place so you can prevent it from happening again. Perhaps you have been heat-styling on too high a heat setting, or you have been coloring your hair too often. Or perhaps you have had time in the sun and have not protected your hair from UV rays. Whatever the cause (or causes), you can take steps to minimize dryness in the future.

To immediately add moisture back-into your hair, use a pre-shampoo conditioning treatment twice a week. Once your hair is in better condition, you can reduce your application to one time weekly.

Can Where You Live Affect Your Hair?

We always go the extra mile for our hair- we splurge on products, we book our color appointments weeks in advance and we pour over our favorite hair stylists’ Instagrams. But did you know that the city you live in could be the culprit behind your less-than-stellar mane? High-stress environments and hair pollution can lead to bad manes or even worse, irreversible hair loss. Read on for how to battle your city and achieve healthy hair.

How does stress affect our hair health?

Stress can affect hair health in major ways including hair thinning and outright hair loss. Alopecia Areata occurs when large chunks of hair start falling out for no apparent reason, leaving behind bald spots. Telogen Effluvium is the second most common type of hair loss and it occurs when there is a change in the number of hair follicles producing hair. This results in more dormant than productive hair follicles and as a consequence, the person experiencing Telogen Efflulvium will face gradual hair loss. Both conditions are serious examples of what can go wrong if you live in a high-stress city and don’t take precautions to curb your emotional tension. Another consequence of living in fast-paced, high-strain cities is pollution. Environmental irritants can wreak havoc on your scalp and overall hair health.

 

How does your city fare?

If you are reading this from Scottsdale, we have good news for you: your city clocked in at number 177 and ranked least stressed in the study. If you are in Detroit, you may want to give your tresses extra TLC. Detroit ranks as the most stressed city in the entire US. Chicago comes in at number 17, Las Vegas is number 20 most stressed. Not surprisingly, Miami ranks in at number 30. We always knew Angelenos were more relaxed than New Yorkers and this proves true. New York city is number 47 and LA is number 56.

Wallethub.com just released a study about the most stressed cities in America. They report that about 100 million people currently consider themselves stressed. What is causing our woes? According to the study dinero is the number one stressor. After money worries, work, family and relationships are creating the tension in the US.

 

What to do?

If you find yourself in a tough city, worry not. There are a few steps you can take to mitigate burnout and consequently improve hair quality. At the risk of sounding like your mother, don’t forget to take your vitamins. High-quality supplements with biotin can help with your hair health. You can also consider using products that protect against pollutants. Exercise and meditation are also amazing ways to get your stress in check.