How To Add Volume To Thin Hair

Styling your thinning hair shouldn’t be something you dread in the morning. Even though our hair thins as we age, it still has a lot of life in it—we just have to treat it a little more gently and show it a lot of love. The process for giving your strands an extra splash of volume starts at the salon and carries through to your own hair habits at home.

Whether we’re mastering no-heat styling tricks or using every tip we know to add thickness to thinning hair, there are tons of ways to get that bit of boost. Below, you’ll find some tricks for adding volume to even the thinnest hair—including some of our best no-heat hairstyles and hacks. Say goodbye to dull, flat hair and hello to volume!

 

Get A Volumizing Haircut

Thin, aging hair will get a lift from a cut that is catered toward their hair type, whether it’s curly, straight or in between. There are plenty of hairstyles for both long and short hair that will add some volume, it’s just a matter of finding that perfect shape. Your hairstylist can help you figure out the right cut for you.

Trick the Eye with Color

By using a technique called hair contouring you can make your aging hair appear fuller just by changing up your hair color. Hair that is all one color can appear flat and lifeless, but by contouring it (adding highlights and low lights) you can instantly add more dimension, making it look more vibrant and voluminous.

Get a Volumizing Shampoo & Conditioner

A volumizing shampoo and conditioner can work in tandem to add volume as well as moisture to aging hair without weighing it down. You can also add a fortifying hair and scalp serum that nourishes the scalp and promotes thicker hair.

Use a Hair Mask for Hydration

Another trick for styling thin hair is to make sure it is getting enough nourishment and moisture. A restorative hair mask, like our Keratin Hair Mask can be used up to 3 times a week to treat dry, brittle hair. A mask will knock out frizz and keep strands silky smooth.

Pick Lightweight Products

As a general rule, you should be doing everything you can to make sure that you aren’t weighing your hair down unnecessarily. Many products that are designed for volumizing are formulated to lift at the root and thicken strands. For fine hair though. This won’t always work because the hair ends up getting to weighed down and instead falls limp.

Spray Most Products Into Your Hand, Not Your Hair

By spraying products directly into your hair, you’re more likely to over-apply them or get product where you don’t want it. Your hands can massage products like serums, gels or mousse into the right places without overcoating your strands and making them fall flat.

Apply Products in Horizontal Layers

Of course, there are some products that should be directly applied to the hair, like dry shampoo. For those, instead of spraying them directly at the roots, separate your hair into layers horizontally and apply the product this way. That way you are getting some of that product underneath the top layer to provide lift and to keep the top layer from becoming weighed down.

Get Over Your Fear of Mousse

Unlike the mouse of golden years that dried out your hair and froze it in place, todays formulas are more elegant and hydrating. Comb a small coin size amount of volumizing whip or mousse from your roots to your ends on wet hair. Be careful not to apply to much or it will weight your hair down. Then blow dry to activate the volumizing products.

Blow Dry Your Hair Upside Down and Opposite of Your Part

Flipping your hair upside down when blow-drying is one way to add volume. By adding heat to your hair while it’s hanging over your head, you’re encouraging the root to stand up rather than lay down. Once it’s dry and you flip it back over it will have an added bit of lift. This works especially well for thin, curly hair since it easily falls victim to gravity’s pull, which loosens curls.

Another way you can add volume while blow-drying is to dry to the opposite side of your part. If your natural part is in the middle, give your wet hair a side part and dry it that way. If your hair naturally parts to the left side, dry it with a middle part or part it to the right. Drying your hair while it’s unnaturally parted will do the same. When you flip your hair back to your natural part, it will have a bit of volume where you dried it. You could also change your part completely. Tricking the hair by changing the part will move that root ever so slightly into a new position and before you know it, you’ll have instant volume.

Skip the Round Brush Until the End

Flip your head upside down and start by rough drying using nothing but your hands. This will lift the roots and roughen up the cuticle. When hair is 60-70% dry, flip it back over and start blow-drying using a ceramic brush to smooth ends and add softness to the style. Don’t pull too hard though or that will just flatten everything out.

Keep Dry Shampoo In our Bag

Dry shampoo and volumizing powders are the best friend of anyone with thin hair. They tend to give better hold and longer lasting volume than hairspray. With the dry shampoo, instead of spraying and then brushing out, leave it be. The powder and starch will build on each other. Try keeping a travel sized dry shampoo or volumizing powder in your bag for any midday pick-me ups your hair may need.

Backcomb Your Hair at the Crown

For a no-heat styling trick that will give you volume, try backcombing your hair at the crown. Instead of teasing your hair too high, tease it just enough to give it some life. Lift your hair up in layers and use a fine-tooth comb to backcomb it at the root. Top it off with a light pass of hairspray to hold it into place.

Set Rollers at the Roots

Another great, no-heat way to get some volume is by using sponge or Velcro rollers right at the root. While your hair is damp, place the rollers right at the root and then let your hair dry. This is a great overnight trick for volume when you wake up.

Use a Crimper

Before trying this one be sure to use a heat protectant spray, like our heat guard. Pull the top layer of your hair up so it’s out of the way, and crimp the roots underneath. You only need to crimp the hair closest to your head because you just want a little bit of lift for volume.

Clip-In Extensions

Extensions are good for more than just adding length, they can also add volume. The trick to making extensions look seamless is by having our hairstylist help you trim and color them to match your natural hair.

How To Manage Split Ends

Split ends happen when the ends of your hair become dry, brittle, and frayed. There are many reasons for split ends and these days they are quite common. Almost everyone will deal with them at some point. Split ends cannot be repaired, only removed or prevented with proper care.

What Causes Split Ends?

  • Mechanical damage such as brushing excessively, drying the hair too roughly, and allowing your hair to rub against rough fabrics.
  • Coloring
  • Chemical treatments perms and relaxers (especially when not done correctly)
  • Excessive exposure to heated styling tools.

All these things damage the cuticle on the hair shaft as you lose more cuticle layers the hair becomes weak, splits and frays.

How To Prevent Split Ends

  • Get regular haircuts and trims, preferably every six weeks.
  • Don’t wash your hair daily. When you do wash, consider only using conditioner and skipping shampoo.
  • Choose all-natural shampoos that contain no harsh ingredients.
  • Use a conditioner after shampooing or use a leave-in conditioner.
  • Do regular mask treatments.
  • Use a wide tooth comb to detangle wet hair. You don’t need to add pressure or brush vigorously, especially if you start at the bottom and work your way up.
  • Do not rub your hair dry, instead apply pressure by gently squeezing the excess water out of the hair.
  • Limit services that damage hair, such as coloring and chemical straightening.
  • Use a heat-protective spray when using heated styling tools.
  • Allow your hair to air dry as much as possible before blow drying and never touch the blow dryer directly to the hair.
  • Take supplements that strengthen the hair, such as biotin and folic acid.
  • Some hairstyles, like ponytails and hair twists, can cause split ends. Limiting how often you wear these hairstyles and using softer hair ties may help prevent damage.
  • Consider a silk pillowcase or silk hair wrap for when you sleep.

Ways To Remove Split Ends:

The only real way to get rid of split ends is to cut them off. Because once a hair is split, there’s nothing that can magically fuse the pieces back together again forever. But if you’re super anti-haircut, especially if you’ve been trying to grow your hair out, ask your stylist to try hair dusting or candle cutting.

Candle Cutting

Candle cutting requires twisting a section of your hair and burning it halfway through with a lighted candle. It’s thought that burning off your split ends can create a seal to help protect the ends from splitting again. Still, some hair care experts worry it may actually cause split ends and damage hair follicles.

After splitting your hair into small sections, the hair stylists twists them around before running a flaming candle along it, without getting too close to the scalp. Candle hair burning has been promoted as an alternative to trimming away split ends and keeping them away for up to 3 months, but it also promises to deliver other benefits.

The most obvious drawback of this hair treatment is the fact that hair is flammable. Even with an experienced hair stylist, there’s always the risk of one wrong move that could set your hair on fire and cause plenty of damage, and in the worst-case scenario, you’ll walk out of the salon with your hair a lot shorter. If you want to try candle cutting, definitely do your research and seek the help of an experienced professional. Doing the method on your own may result in burned hair or skin.

Hair Dusting

Hair dusting is a technique in which you don’t get rid of any hair length, but only the damaged hair tips. This can be done by snipping the very bottom of each hair strand. Think of it in terms of removing fuzz from clothes. So, if you’re trying to grow out your locks for summer or simply to rid damage from color treatment or heat styling, hair dusting will get you there with zero hassle, but a whole lot of flair.

The technique works on any hair type or texture, but for ladies with very wavy or curly hair, the stylist will need to smooth it out to see the damaged ends that need to be dusted. It won’t thin out your hair either—in fact, in the long run, it does quite the opposite. By removing split ends regularly, you keep the damage from creeping up your strands. That’s incredibly important for those who color treat or style their hair with heat tools regularly.

Not all stylists are masters of hair dusting though, so make sure to verify that your hairdresser can do the job properly. It goes without saying, dusting needs to be up to snuff for the outcome to be hair that looks and feels enviably healthy.

Fall Hair Care Tips

The change in the weather can definitely be confusing for your hair. There are some changes to your hair care routine that can help keeps those lovely locks healthy and shiny.

 

Boost the Moisture

The same itchy, dry skin that irritates you during winter also irritates your hair. The cold air can cause dry, itchy scalp as well. So when the air starts to turn cooler it’s time to add a weekly hair mask to your routine like our Color Safe Keratin Infused Hair Mask or switch up your shampoo and conditioner to ones that are more moisturizing. It will help moisturize and energize your scalp to relieve discomfort, while also helping to reduce buildup so that your scalp can stay clean and healthy.

 

Fight Frizz

Even though the humidity is gone it doesn’t mean that you are done dealing with frizz. The static frizz caused by the heat and friction from our hats and scarves can be just as problematic. To combat the frizz and help keep fly-a-ways in place try using a serum like our Revitalizing Moroccan Hair Serum or our Infinity Drops to help protect and enhance your hairs natural luster. They work by coating the surface of the hair, helping to lock in moisture and shine while also blocking out things like dryness and friction.

 

Pump Up The Volume

It’s easy to pump up the volume when the air is full of humidity, but as the weather gets colder it may cause your hair to go flat. Try using a volumizing spray or a volumizing blow dryer like our Volumizer Pro or Air Styler to help give hair a much-needed boost.

 

Massage Your Scalp

Get your boar bristle brush/ essential oil mixture of choice/scalp massager ready and be sure to use it at least once every 2-3 days. A relaxing 10 to 15 minute massage will increase the blood circulation in your scalp, speeding up new growth and will give you healthier hair and scalp in the long run.

 

Time for a Trim & Maybe a Color Change

The combination of indoor central heating and the extreme change in weather conditions from rain, wind and autumn sun can affect the health of your hair, making it more prone to damage and split ends. Light doesn’t reflect well from damaged hair either so it can be dull and lackluster. The solution? Pop into your favorite salon and go get a trim. You’ll soon have the new shiny autumn hair of your dreams.

 

You may also want to consider going darker with your color. Summer is synonymous with sun-kissed hair, with highlights a staple for pretty much all shades. But as your time spent outside shortens as the weather gets colder, those highlights will fade. We recommend beating nature to the punch by going a shade or two darker for fall. Coloring it darker allows this transition to happen easier and evens out the color.

 

Give the Pony Tails a Rest

It’s a cute style for those warm summer days, but during the colder weather can cause breakage and unnecessary scalp stress. Instead wear your hair down or softly pinned up.

 

Now that you have noted down these hair care routine little tips and tricks, you are ready to welcome the new season along with a pumpkin spice latte and stunningly good hair! Did we miss any tips that have worked for you? Feel free to share them in the comments section below.

Healthy Hair Rules

In today’s age of intense dye jobs, pin straight blowouts and bouncy curls, it’s no longer a question of “is my hair is damaged”, but “how bad is it?”. Now, before you throw in the towel or start feeling hopeless because you’d rather give up carbs than your flat iron, there is hope. With hair care products amping themselves up with natural ingredients to help repair the damage there are some tricks you can use to keep your hair healthy and happy.

 

GET IT WET LESS

Water makes hair swell from the inside, which forces the cuticle up. When that happens over and over again, you get frizz and breakage. Don’t wash your hair more than you have to. Whenever you can skip a day, that’s great. Instead, embrace a dry shampoo that’s a hard-core oil and odor absorber.

 

GET SMARTER ABOUT YOUR HAIR CARE PRODUCTS

Our Keratin, Biotin & Argan Oil infused shampoo & conditioner are rich in vitamins A & C, natural oils and botanicals like Aloe, Jojoba Seed Oil, Olive Oil and Macadamia Seed Oil. These gentle formulas not only help hydrate the scalp, but also help to clean hair follicles so your hair can grow fuller and longer. They make great treatments for dry and brittle hair and will leave your locks smooth and shiny. Forget split ends and dead hair forever.

 

CHANGE THE WAY YOU CONDITION

We all know they smooth frizz and make your hair softer and shinier. But if you own a blow-dryer or flatiron, you should also know that conditioners are critical to heat protection. It’s just as important as heat-protectant spray, if not more, because conditioner is better at coating the hair. Like our Truffle Leave-In Conditioner; infused with truffles, biotin and other natural ingredients, it absorbs deep into the roots, hair follicles and scalp to help nourish, moisturize and strengthen from the inside out. This allows for more residual conditioner to be left on the hair.

 

ADD LAYERS

Since heat is the worst thing for your hair, double down with a heat-protectant spray. But recognize that if it’s going to work, you’ve got to apply it the right way: Grab small sections of damp hair and mist each one up and down the length (two or three spritzes per section). When you’re finished, comb your hair to distribute the formula—heat protectants are pretty useless if they’re not applied all over, getting there takes only a few seconds. Look for one that protects hair up to 450 degrees (it’ll say so on the label).

 

COTTON IS BEST

Your cotton Madonna Virgin Tour tee is gentler on your hair than a towel for drying. Its why top hairstylists keep them on hand. They don’t rough up the cuticle as much, so you don’t have to work as hard to smooth the hair and make it look healthy.

 

COOL OFF

If your hair feels hot after you blow-dry or flatiron it, that means it’s still frying. Hit the cold-shot button on your dryer to not only cool it off, but also to set the style.

 

GET CREATIVE

If you air-dry your hair overnight, you can minimize damage and free up time for snoozing, coffee, yoga or whatever in the morning. One trick that works for all hair types: Sleep with damp hair in two loose braids. It smooths frizz, loosens curls, and gives straight hair beachy waves.

 

TREAT YOURSELF

Weekly scalp treatments, like our Keratin Color Safe Revitalizing Hair Mask, make a bigger difference in the long run than you’d think. Keeping the hair follicles clean prevents the blockage and inflammation that leads to thinning hair later in life.

 

SHINE BOOST

Both our Revitalizing Moroccan Hair Serum and Infinity Drops are infused with Keratin, Biotin, Argan Oil and have been designed with no preservatives to help dry, lifeless hair come back to life! The unique blend of natural oils and botanical extracts, like Jojoba Seed Oil, Shea Butter, Olive Oil and Macadamia Seed Oil, help to hydrate and seal the cuticle, providing optimal nourishment, hydration, and silky softness to help tame frizz.

They slide effortlessly through hair and work wonders for all hair types, from fine to coarse. Everyone can enjoy smooth locks with a just a few drops of these miraculous serums.

How To Cut Your Hair At Home

It’s when you can’t go out to get your haircut that you really begin to appreciate your hairstylist. Let’s be honest—even once we are able to leave our homes after quarantine is over, chances are that it will be pretty difficult to get a coveted appointment at hair or nail salons.

The good news is that, just like you can bring the nail salon home with you, you can bring your hair salon home too. If you think your hair is getting a little rough around the edges, consider trying your hand at a home haircut.

Before cutting your own hair, ask yourself the following:

 

IS IT TIME TO CUT YOUR HAIR, OR CAN YOU WAIT?

If you can wait to cut your hair, you may be better off waiting for a salon to open— but how do you know if you can wait or not? Here are some tell-tale signs that you may be overdue for a haircut.

If the ends of your hairs are splitting in a million directions (or even just 2) or you see little white bits at the ends, it needs a clean-up. When the hair starts to break or split it will keep travelling further and further up the hair shaft creating breakage higher up in the hair, or causing you to get a bigger “trim” than you expected!

If you are going to give yourself a home haircut, stick to simple trims of anything 1 inch or less of the length of your hair. This kind of subtle cut won’t make a drastic difference, so if you mess up, you won’t notice it as much. It’ll also be easier to salvage down the road.

 

MAYBE TRY A HAIR MASK INSTEAD

If your hair is pretty healthy, or just slightly dry on the ends, try a hair mask at home first before committing to a home haircut.

Use salon quality hair masks, or masks with keratin, fatty acids, or vinegar. Because vinegar is acidic, it can be used to help lower the pH of the hair. This will tighten the cuticle, which makes hair look shiny, and seals split ends.

 

TOOLS YOU WILL NEED

Here’s what you will need:

  • Sharp scissors – be sure to use the sharpest scissors you can find. Better yet, hair dressing scissors. Your kitchen shears will not be acceptable for this!
  • A long comb that is not too fine
  • Broom/ dust pan
  • A blowdryer
  • 2 hair clips

 

STEP 1: FIND AN OPEN SPACE

Clear a space to cut your hair where it’s not falling onto a counter or into the sink or shower drain. It’s much easier to just sweep up off the floor than trying to get it out of the sink and off the counter.

 

STEP 2: DRY YOUR HAIR COMPLETELY

Before you cut your hair, it’s important to dry your hair completely.

When the hair is dry, it has slightly more volume. This way, when you cut, you will see exactly where the hair will sit. If you cut your hair wet, however, once it dries and bounces up, you may find that you ended up cutting off more than expected. This especially rings true for bangs!

The best way to dry your hair if you have straight or wavy hair is to blow dry your locks smooth. For curly hair, however, we suggest to let your hair air dry naturally, or however you usually style it. Once it is totally dry and you determine how much hair you are going to cut, to cut half of that.

It will spring up more than you want, and you will end up with a 2-inch haircut when you were only trying to cut 1 inch.

 

STEP 3: THE BASICS OF HAIR CUTTING

When deciding on how much to cut, always cut less than what you think you need to cut off. We suggest trying to cut a small piece first to see if the length is as you like. Then, use that as a guide when cutting the rest of your hair. Go slowly, adding small sections to the guide until all your hair is cut.

How to cut your own hair in layers

If you are going to layer your hair, proceed with caution. We suggest not trying to cut your layers yourself, and only making subtle tweaks.

  1. OVERDIRECTING

At most, if you notice splits in your layers, part your hair normally, then split the hair in half down the back bringing it forward over your shoulders. This is called over directing

When your hair is brought forward and you cut the ends, you will naturally create that slight U shape when it falls back. The hair is wrapping forward leaving length when put back into place. That should help create a softer feel through the perimeter.

  1. THE HORSESHOE PART

If you do decide to cut your layers though, a general rule of thumb is the higher the lift, the softer the feel. To do this, start by creating a horseshoe section from temple to temple and around the back of your crown, at the widest part of your head.

The area closest to the back of the head/horseshoe should be where the longest length stays and nearer to your face is where it can be slightly shorter.

Brush all the hair straight up (if some falls away leave it) and angle the hair up so it creates a straight line from your face to the tips of your hair. Slide your fingers to the very tips where you see the breakage bits and or where you can see right through the hair.

If this is a lot of hair, don’t cut it—it should only be about 1 inch or less.

  1. POINT CUTTIN

Once it’s safe to cut, point your scissors at your hair to create a point cutting effect.

When point cutting, open your scissors as you place them in your hair ends, and only close them as you are sliding away. “This is the best way to avoid cutting your fingers or creating a hole in the hair. Point cutting is also an easy way to hide any mistakes and soften the finish.

You can apply the point cutting technique to the lengths/perimeter of your hair and to soften a blunt cut.

 

Getting rid of split ends

You may find that your length is just fine, and that you just want to get rid of split ends. Fortunately, this is pretty easy!  Before you even cut your ends however, try a vinegar treatment to help seal them first.

When cutting, bring your hair forward, and part where you usually do. Then, bring your hair forward over your shoulders, and cut slightly less than you think you need to. Make sure to check that the length is the same on both sides. This is also a good strategy to use to make sure you cut your locks all one length when you are giving yourself a trim.

When you are cutting your split ends, make sure you keep your chin up. Look in the mirror and do not look down. You will angle your hair down and end up taking off too much length by accident!

 

How to cut face framing layers

To cut trendy face framing layers, first start with your regular part, then a vertical section down to the front of your ears.

Comb this section inch by inch over directing forward at about 40 degrees. The bottom of your first inch section shouldn’t lift higher than the corner of your eye or cheekbone.

Next, slide your fingers down keeping your fingers straight, not angled, as the hair sticking out should now be at a slight angle. Point cut a little at a time. For guidance, follow the shape originally created by your hairstylist.

 

How to cut the back of your hair

Cutting the back of your hair may seem like a struggle, but it doesn’t have to be. To cut the back of your hair, always angle the hair forward. It is a more natural look to have the hair slightly shorter in the front than the back and the over direction will create this. This will also help you to see the front and what you are cutting so that you can ensure that you have an even and balanced cut.

 

How to cut curly & wavy hair

The reality is that everyone has a different hair type, so take this into consideration before you start cutting.

Curly hair is a unique (and fabulous) texture that cuts slightly differently. Fortunately, our specialist Dee has taught us how to cut our curly locks without having to leave the house (at least for the time being.)

For curly hair, first air dry your hair. Then, style to your desired shape and cut only what seems to be out of place. According to Dee, if you have curly hair, always cut half of what you planned to cut.

1 inch will look like 2 inches, because with curls and waves, the shorter that hair the stronger the curl.

 

How to cut your own bangs

If you do not have bangs, this may not be the best time to try to give yourself some. Instead, experiment with clip in bangs and decide if you want to make the style permanent once you can see a professional hair stylist.

If you already have bangs and want to maintain them during this time—or are feeling daring and want to cut your own bangs—here’s how to cut your own bangs at home.

Disclaimer: proceed with caution!

STEP 1:  BLOW DRY YOUR BANGS

Blow dry your bangs and style them as you usually would. Part your hair down the center, and then create a triangle that is 1 ½ inches back from the hairline with the sides angled to meet at your pupils/center of your eye.

This may seem like a small section, but it will fan out fuller once cut and styled and you can always add more later.

STEP 2: CLIP YOUR HAIR BACK

Clip all the rest of your hair away so you can focus on your bangs.

STEP 3:  START IN THE CENTER OF YOUR TRIANGLE

Start with a 1/4 inch section in the center of your triangle. Comb this down using a wide tooth comb with very little tension and find where you want the length to hit. This is going to be your guide.

Cut less than you think, because you can always cut more.

STEP 4: KEEP YOUR CHIN UP

If you’re looking down, you are more likely to cut too much length. If you cut too much, add a tiny bit of hair from each side off the center and cut slightly longer where you want it. You can “curtain” your bangs to hide the mistake in the middle.

STEP 5: SPLIT HAIR IN THE CENTER

Split your hair in the center once you have found the desired length and have moved to the next side. Add another 1/4 inch section to the “guide” from either side.

Keeping the hair you have already cut straight down in the center and over direct the new section to meet the guide. Then, cut the new section to the length of your guide.

STEP 6: CUT STRAIGHT DOWN IN THE CENTRE

If you are trying to create a more curtain or angled fringe, work side to side, over directing from your center part. Have your guide pointing at the opposite pupil or center of eye and bringing each added section over to meet your guide. Then, cut the added sections to the length of your guide.

STEP 7: ADJUST

Once all hair is cut, you should have your desired fringe. If it feels too narrow, make your triangle slightly bigger and add more hair 1/4 inch at a time!”

 

Dos and don’ts of cutting your own hair at home

  • Use the sharpest scissors you own.
  • Use a comb that is not a super fine tooth. A slightly wider helps to give less tension so you don’t end up with an uneven cut.
  • Do not try to use clippers like the pros do to cut your length, it cuts fast and a lot of hair at once.
  • Don’t cut over a carpet, or in an area you do not want little bits of hair flying around, hair tends to get everywhere!
  • Always cut half of what you plan to cut, and go shorter in increments if need be.

Although we have provided instructions, it is best to leave layers and bangs cutting to the pros.

Have any more questions on how to cut your own hair? Drop them in the comments below, and we’ll be happy to help.

 

Ref: www.luxyhair.com

How To Determine Your Curl Type

Decoding your curl type can be confusing. Several different textures can exist on one head alone, which all have to somehow look cohesive when you rock a style. Plus, there’s been some debate as to whether the typing system, originally started by hairstylist Andre Walker and modified by folks in the curly community, is divisive or even too narrow. But controversy aside, many people have found that even if it isn’t perfect, it can be super useful in at least being able to identify your curl pattern (or patterns) so you know where to start when it comes to hair care. Follow the easy tip sheet below (complete with recommendations for your hair-care stash) to help you better ID your curl type.

 

WHERE TO START

Your curl type is determined by the shape of the follicle that your hair grows out of from your scalp. The flatter or more oval shaped the follicle, the curlier your hair; while the more circular the cross-section, the straighter your hair. Your curl pattern is also identified by the shape that the strands of hair make, whether they kink, curve, or wind around themselves into spirals.

Most textured gals have more than one type of pattern on their head, so you may have a combination of, say, kinky, coily, wavy, and curly. To identify your curl shape and pattern (or patterns), it’s best determined while your hair is sopping wet. 1s are straight, 2s are wavy, 3s are curly, and 4s are coily.

The sub-classifications of A to C are based on the width or diameter of your wave, curl, or coil pattern. A’s have a wider pattern size, B’s medium, and C’s the smallest of the three. The real beauty of identifying your hair type is that you’re better at understanding how to care for your texture so you can have more versatility.

 

Type 2 (Wavy)

Type 2 waves are bendable, can be fine to coarse, and have a definitive S pattern that lays closer to the head.

2A

2As have a fine, barely-there tousled texture that’s very easy to straighten. People with this texture have to be wary of using heavy styling products that can easily weigh their strands down, rendering them limp and lifeless. 2A waves lack volume at the root. We recommend using an airy, water-based mousse to add a bit of oomph at the base and to make hair look fluffier and fuller.

 

2B

2Bs are flatter at the crown with defined S-shaped waves starting from the mid-length. Strands are thicker in diameter than a 2A, and you’ll have to put in a bit of elbow grease into getting it straight. To enhance your natural surfer-babe waves, a Sea Spray for sexy texture that’s never crunchy or stiff.

 

2C

2C waves are thick, coarse, and more susceptible to frizzing. The S-bends are well-defined and begin at the roots. Use a non-lathering, sulfate-free shampoo so as not to strip essential moisture from strands. We also recommend layering a leave-in conditioner under a mousse to lock in your hair’s natural wave pattern while adding hydration.

 

Type 3 (Curly)

Type 3 curly hair can range from loose, buoyant loops to tight, springy corkscrews which have some sheen but are prone to frizz.

3A

3A strands tend to be shiny with large, loose curls that are about the size of a piece of sidewalk chalk. Scrunch some Defrizzing Curl Cream into your dry hair to help emphasize the curl texture. But keep your hands (or brush or comb, for that matter) from touching your curls afterward, or you run the risk of having a halo full of frizz. To maintain those juicy springs, simply spritz your hair with a curl refresher when it needs a boost.

 

3B

3Bs have coarse, springy ringlets with a circumference similar to a Sharpie marker. This hair texture can get dry, so look for styling gels that have humectants in them to attract moisture to strands. Try applying a styling gel when your hair is wet so you’ll get definition without frizz.

 

3C

3C curls are tight corkscrews that range in circumference from a straw to a pencil. Strands are densely packed together, giving way to lots of natural volume. Frizziness can be an issue with this type, so use a sulfate-free, creamy cleanser so as not to dry out your hair.

Also, try layering a mousse over a styling cream when the hair is sopping wet to allow curls to clump together and dry faster. Your co-wash reveals your curl pattern, while your styling product captures it.

 

Type 4 (Coily)

Coily hair, commonly referred to as Afro-textured or kinky hair, is naturally very dry and spongy in texture and can be soft and fine or coarse and wiry. Strands form very tight, small curls of zig-zags right from the scalp and are prone to major shrinkage.

4A

4As have dense springy, S-patterned coils that are the circumference of a crochet needle. If you’re a fan of wash and go’s, styling should be done more frequently to keep this coily texture popping with soft, pliable strands. A curling cream with a leave-in moisturizer is a must for adding more moisture to daily wash-and-go styling.

 

4B

4B strands are densely packed and can bend in sharp angles like the letter Z. A good Moisture Spray is all that you need to keep coils and kinks refreshed and hydrated between shampooing, or as a style quick-pick-me-up during the day. Styling creams are also great for this hair type because they are thicker and are great for palm-rolling or shingling, two types of product distribution methods that stretch out coils and clump them for greater texture definition and elongation.

 

4C

4C hair is similar to 4B textures, but the tightly coiled strands are more fragile and have a very tight zig-zag pattern that is sometimes indiscernible to the eye. This hair type experiences the greatest amount of shrinkage, about 75 % or more than the other textures.

Since shrinkage and dryness are major concerns for these tightly-coiled folks, use a liberal amount of leave-in moisturizer to max the length of those strands. Castor oil is also a great hydrator and sealant for this very dry texture.

 

Ref: https://www.allure.com/gallery/curl-hair-type-guide

10 Easy Ways To Get Wavy Hair

What comes to mind when we say ‘beach bum’? A beautiful sun kissed girl with gorgeous wavy hair as a result of the sea salt laden air. Who hasn’t dreamt of having relaxed looking hair like that? We sure have! So, we scoured the internet to look for ways to get those gorgeous waves in your hair in the most effortless ways possible.

 

  1. Princess Leia Buns Technique

The force will surely be with you when you embark on this journey to get wavy hair. All you need to do is roll up your hair into 2 buns (a la Princess Leia) and you will end up with the hair of your dreams the next morning!

What You Need:

  • Hair brush
  • Anti-frizz serum
  • Bobby pins

How To Style:

  1. Brush out all the knots and tangles from your hair while it is still damp.
  2. Apply anti-frizz serum to your hair to prevent it from frizzing up as it dries.
  3. Part your hair down the middle.
  4. Pick up a 2-inch section of hair from right near the left side of your parting.
  5. Start twisting it while adding more and more hair to it from both sides.
  6. Once this twisted section of hair has gone past your ear, twist the hair the rest of the way down until the very end.
  7. Roll this twisted hair into a bun and pin it down behind your ear. You could also use some hair elastics to further secure it in place.
  8. Repeat the same process on the right side.
  9. Sleep with these twisted buns in your hair overnight.
  10. Next morning, open up your buns and shake your hair out.
  11. Rub a little bit of Argan oil all over your wavy hair to give it some shine.

 

  1. The Hair Knotting Technique

What You Need:

  • Hair brush
  • Claw clips or double prong clips
  • Hairspray

How To Style:

  1. Brush out all knots and tangles from your damp hair.
  2. Grab a 3 inch section of hair from the front and create a loop with it near the roots.
  3. Pull the tail end of the hair through the loop, but not all the way through.
  4. Clip this knotted section of hair to your head.
  5. Create such knots with all your hair.
  6. Leave the knots in for a few hours until your hair dries.
  7. Spritz on some hairspray before opening the knots.
  8. Brush out your hair to give your waves a softer look.

 

  1. Twisted Crown Technique

What You Need:

  • Bobby pins
  • U-pins
  • Light hold hairspray

How To Style:

  1. Part your damp hair down the middle and divide it into 2 sections, one on each side.
  2. Simply twist the hair on your left, right until the very ends.
  3. Place this twisted hair across the crown of your head and pin it behind your right ear.
  4. Insert more bobby pins and U-pins to further secure it in place.
  5. Repeat steps 2 to 4 on the right side.
  6. Keep these crown twist in your hair overnight.
  7. Spritz on some light hold hairspray over your hair before unraveling it and shaking out the waves.

 

  1. The Scarf Technique

What You Need:

How To Style:

  1. Spritz on texturizing spray all over your damp hair.
  2. Tie a hair elastic just a couple of inches above the ends of your hair.
  3. Tie a knot at the center point of your scarf.
  4. Hold your scarf behind your head and flip the end of your ponytail over it.
  5. Start rolling the scarf towards your head while wrapping your hair around it.
  6. When you have reached the roots of your hair, tie the end of the scarf at the top of your head.
  7. Sleep with this wrapped up hair overnight and remove it in the morning to get gorgeous wavy hair.

 

  1. The Straightened Braids Technique

What You Need:

How To Style:

  1. Starting out with dry hair, tie all your hair into several braids, depending on how thick and long your hair is.
  2. Loosen your braids to make them as flat as possible.
  3. Clamp down your straightening iron at the very top of your first braids and hold it there for a few seconds.
  4. Then move down your braid a little, clamp your iron down again, and hold it there for a few seconds.
  5. Keep repeating this until you’ve reached the end of your braid.
  6. Repeat this procedure with all your braids.
  7. Spray on some light hold hairspray before opening your braids.
  8. Shake out your hair to create more volume in your waves.

 

  1. The Hair Scrunching Technique

What You Need:

  • Volumizing mousse
  • Towel

How To Style:

  1. Apply a dollop of volumizing mousse to your hair right after you step out of the shower.
  2. Towel dry your hair as much as possible.
  3. Bend your head forward so that your hair falls in front of you.
  4. Now start scrunching your hair from the ends by balling it up in your hands and squeezing it for a few seconds.
  5. Keep doing this every 10 minutes until your hair completely dries.

 

  1. The Snake Braiding Technique

What You Need:

How To Style

  1. Brush out your damp hair to remove all knots and tangles.
  2. Flip all your hair forward, in front of your head.
  3. From near your left ear, at the nape of your neck, start Dutch braiding your hair in a horizontal manner.
  4. To do so, pick up a 2-inch section of hair and divide it into 3 strands.
  5. Braid this hair by flipping the side strands under the middle strand and adding more hair to the braid with each subsequent strand.
  6. Once your Dutch braid has reached near your right ear, change your pattern and continue braiding in the opposite direction.
  7. Keep braiding this way so that all your hair is braided in a ‘snake’ pattern.
  8. Once you’ve run out of hair to add to the braid, simple braid the rest of the hair down. Pin this tail of your braid to your head.
  9. Leave this ‘snake’ braid in until your hair is dry.
  10. Spritz on some hairspray before opening your braid.
  11. Brush out your hair to reveal gorgeous, wavy hair.

 

  1. The Fishtail Braid Technique

What You Need:

How To Style:

  1. Spray texturizing spray all over your almost-dry hair.
  2. Split your hair into 2 sections.
  3. Take a thin section of hair from the outer side of your left section and add it to the inner side of your right section.
  4. Take a thin section of hair from the outer side of your right section and add it to the inner side of your left section.
  5. Keep repeating steps 3 and 4 alternately until you reach the end of your braid, then secure it with a hair elastic.
  6. Sleep in with this braid overnight.
  7. Next morning, open your braid and shake out your hair to unravel your waves.

 

  1. The Friar Tuck Technique

What You Need:

  • Hair brush
  • Sea salt spray
  • Elasticated headband
  • Silk scarf
  • Dry shampoo

How To Style:

  1. Brush out all the knots and tangles from your dry hair.
  2. Part your hair down the middle.
  3. Dampen your hair by spritzing on sea salt spray over it.
  4. Put on your headband in such a way that it lies across your forehead, and all your hair lies under it.
  5. Pick up a 2-inch section of hair from your left side, flip it up and tuck it under the headband.
  6. Now add more hair to that section and flip and tuck it the same way.
  7. Keep repeating steps 5 and 6 until your reach the back of your head.
  8. Then repeat the whole tucking procedure on the right side.
  9. Tie a silk scarf around your hair to prevent it from frizzing and leave it on overnight.
  10. Next morning, remove all your hair from the headband and brush out your tangles.
  11. Finish off by spritzing on some dry shampoo to give your waves more hold.

 

  1. The Flat Iron Technique

What You Need:

  • Dry shampoo
  • Flat Iron
  • Sea salt spray
  • Light hold hairspray

How To Style:

  1. Start off by spraying dry shampoo at the roots of your hair.
  2. Section off the top half of your hair.
  3. With a flat iron, curl the lower half of the loose hair at the bottom.
  4. Unclip the hair on top and repeat the previous step.
  5. Spritz on some sea salt spray and scrunch your hair with your hands to give your waves some more texture.
  6. Finish off with some hairspray to prevent your waves from unraveling through the day.

 

Ref: www.stylecraze.com

Surprising Uses For Your Beard Oil

A quality beard oil can be an amazing, versatile product that does much more than enhance your beard. Below are some of our favorite unconventional uses for your premium beard oil.

 

  1. Overnight Beard Mask

A beard mask is an intensive treatment for dry and damaged beards and using your beard oil as a beard mask is super easy.

Shower before bedtime and pat your beard dry. Then, apply at least double the amount of beard oil you’d typically use. Finally, rinse out with cool water upon waking in the morning

 

  1. Pre-Shave Oil

As the name implies, pre-shave oil is used before applying shaving cream/shaving. They provide protection against razor burn; soften your stubble resulting in a smoother, more comfortable shave; help “lift” the whiskers thereby promoting a closer shave; and moisturize your skin. Your face will feel soft and smooth after shaving

Remember, not all oils are created equal. Cheaper beard oils tend to clog your pores (and razor) when applied directly to the skin.

Shower or rinse your face with warm water to open up your pores and towel dry. Then, dispense a few pumps of beard oil into your hand, rub together and massage into the area to be shaved. Apply shaving cream on top and shave as usual.

 

  1. Cuticle Oil

Say what now? We know, this might be a new one to you. A cuticle oil is applied to your nails/skin resulting in softer, healthier and less brittle nails. If you work with your hands/wash them frequently, give this a try. You’ll find your nails catching on fabric far less and your cuticles will no longer be a flakey, white mess at the base of your nails.

Wash and dry your hands. Then apply a few drops of beard oil and massage into your nails and skin. You’ll notice a difference the next morning, but for maximum benefit, consistency is key.

 

  1. Hair Conditioner

A little goes a long way – warm a drop or two in your palms, then work it through your hair, massaging it into your scalp. You’ll notice that your hair is not only softer and shinier, but also more manageable. Argan oil also stimulates circulation, so your hair growth will get a boost, too. (This same circulation-stimulating property applies when you use argan oil in your beard).

It’s also great for taming hair on the fly: if you’ve got frizz or flyaways, rub half a drop of beard oil over your trouble spots.

 

  1. Hair Mask

A hair mask is a deep conditioning treatment that helps heal dry and damaged hair.

Wash and towel dry your hair. Dispense desired amount of beard oil into your hands and rub together. Then, massage the oil into your hair, working it in root to tip. For added effectiveness, wrap (or place) a warm towel over your hair to speed absorption. Leave in for at least 20 minutes or sleep with it overnight. When done, rinse out excess oil with cool water and towel dry

 

  1. Moisturize Dry Skin

Rub a few drops wherever you feel chapped: on your face, elbows, cuticles, and nails. If you have oily or acne-prone skin, start with a tiny amount and only add more as needed, since applying too much oil can overwhelm your skin’s natural balance.

 

  1. Protect From Heat Styling

If you blow dry your hair into an undercut or quiff, this one’s for you. Instead of using a hairstyling product loaded with chemicals, try beard oil. Distribute 2 – 3 drops of beard oil through your hair. The oil will coat your hair shaft, protecting your strands from heat damage.

 

  1. Use In An Essential Oil Diffuser

You can literally turn your Beard Oil into a subtle room fragrance. Place a few drops into an essential oil diffuser to spread your favorite scent all around your house.

 

  1. As A Household Lubricant

In a pinch, beard oil can fix a squeaky hinge, wheel, or door that refuses to slide. Just try not to use it all up on household fixes.

Hair Braiding For Beginners

Some of us are more gifted in the hair department than others, and while your best friend can create an upside-down French-braid bun in the time it takes you to google “how to braid,” you may need a little bit of extra help. And that’s where we come in.

From a waterfall braid to a chain braid to a good ol’ French braid we are here to show you exactly how to master braiding. Don’t worry, you’ve got this.

FRENCH BRAIDS

  1. Brush your hair with a boar-bristle paddle brush until it’s smooth (or if you have curly hair, try gently finger-detangling to avoid destroying your curl pattern).
  2. Then, using a rat-tail comb or your fingers, section off the triangle of hair from your forehead to the crown of your head.
  3. Split the section into three pieces and three-strand braid them, making sure to incorporate more hair from each side of your head each time you cross the hair over.
  4. Continue braiding and feeding in sections until you reach the ends, then tie off with an elastic.

 

DUTCH BRAIDS

  1. To create this inverted, inside-out French braid, follow steps 1 and 2 from above (brush or detangle, then section off a triangle of hair).
  2. Here’s where the difference comes in: Instead of crossing sections of hair over one another and into the middle while braiding (mime it with your hands right now; you’ll see what I mean), you’re going to reverse the direction and cross your sections underneath each other, pulling from the inside out. This will create that popped-out finish that makes Dutch braids so noticeable.

 

ROPE BRAIDS

  1. Brush your hair back into a ponytail, tying off with an elastic.
  2. Rub a dab of pomade between your fingertips (it’ll help keep stray hairs in place while you work), then split the ponytail in two sections, then twist each section inward in the same direction.
  3. Then, cross and twist the two sections together, securing the ends with an elastic band. Mist the rope braid with hairspray to keep it locked in place.

 

FISHTAIL BRAIDS

  1. After detangling or combing your hair, divide it into pigtails. Clip one section out of the way while you work to make it easier.
  2. Split your hair in half, gripping both sections in each hand. Then, with your pointed finger, pull a small piece of hair from the outside of the left section and cross it over, joining it on the inside of the right section.
  3. Repeat on the other side, pulling a piece of hair from the outside of the right section and crossing it over to the inside of the left section.
  4. Keep braiding to the ends, then secure your fishtail braid with an elastic. Unclip the other half of your hair and repeat until you have two fishtail braids.
  5. Then, fatten up the braids by tugging on the edges of the fishtails for an intentionally undone look.

 

FRENCH FISHTAIL BRAIDS

  1. Unless you were #blessed with curly hair, curl your hair first to give your hair some added texture and grip. Pro tip: Mist on some hair spray before and after you curl for even more hold.
  2. Next, create a deep part over the arch of one eyebrow, then divide your hair in half down the middle.
  3. French-braid each side of your hair, clipping the braids in place when you reach the nape of your neck.
  4. Undo the clips and three-strand braid the two sections together twice—just two passes to join them together, before switching to a fishtail braid.
  5. Fishtail braid the rest of your hair together, tying off the ends with an elastic.

 

HALO CROWN BRAIDS

  1. Part your hair down the center with your fingers or a comb.
  2. Starting at the nape of your neck on your left side, Dutch-braid your hair (like you did earlier) up and around the side of your head. Yes, you’ll have to really tilt your head to the side for this, so we highly recommend clipping one side of your hair up and out of the way while you work.
  3. Once you reach your temple, continue Dutch-braiding across your hairline and back down the other side of your head. Tie off the ends with an elastic.
  4. Tuck the secured ends under the braid, pinning it in place. Boom—halo braid.

 

WATERFALL BRAIDS

  1. After center-parting your hair (or you can do a little off to the side, if you’re not a middle-part person), begin French-braiding your hair from your hairline to your temple.
  2. Next, while still holding your three sections, continue French-braiding, but instead of crossing the outer piece (the one nearest your face, rather than the ceiling), drop it. Yup, literally just drop it down with the rest of your hair, so you’re only holding two sections now.
  3. Then continue the French-braid part: Grab another section of hair from your hairline, add it to your braid like normal, and braid it. But when it comes time to cross that outer section over, just drop it. Basically, you’re only French-braiding one half of the section.
  4. Continue braiding until you reach the back of your head, then repeat on the other side. Join the two sections in back, pinning in place.

 

CHAINLINK BRAIDS

  1. Secure your hair into a low ponytail, then wrap and pin a piece of hair around your elastic so it looks polished.
  2. Then split your ponytail into four sections (to make this easy, label them in your head as one, two, three, four from left to right).
  3. Take the third section and cross it over the second section, then take the fourth section and cross it under the second and third sections, and then over the third section. Next, drop the second piece and bring the first section under the third and fourth pieces.
  4. Continue this sequence until you’ve reached the ends, then secure with a hair tie.

 

BRAIDED BUNS

  1. Create two Dutch braids on each side of your part, braiding all the way to the ends before tying them off with an elastic.
  2. Crisscross them at the back of your head, then clip them up and out of the way while you work on the bun portion.
  3. Braid the rest of your loose hair into a regular three-strand braid and wrap it in a bun, bobby-pinning it in place. Finally, wrap the two crisscrossed braids around the first bun and pin it into place.

 

SPIRAL BRAIDS

  1. Scoop up half your hair (like you’re creating a half-up ponytail), and starting on the side of your crown, begin French-braiding counterclockwise across the front of your hairline.
  2. Continue braiding down the left side of your head and around the nape of your neck, guiding the braid up and into the space on the crown of your head to create a spiral.
  3. Finish by tucking the ends of your hair into the braid along your hairline to conceal it.

 

FRENCH SIDE BRAIDS

  1. As you can tell, this braid is all about major volume. So, unless you’ve already got thick, voluminous texture, start by curling your hair and teasing it at the hairline and crown to create major volume.
  2. Then, pull your hair over your shoulder and French-braid it, leaving out the layers and flyaways around your face to soften the look.
  3. Continue braiding to the ends, securing it with an elastic band and a coat of hair spray.

 

FISHTAIL FLOWER BRAIDS

  1. Center-part your hair, then, on each side of your part, create two thin fishtail braids, braiding to the middle of each section.
  2. Wrap your tiny fishtail braids into a bun and bobby-pin them in place.
  3. Then, take a new, loose piece of hair from underneath the bun and fishtail-braid it all the way to the ends, securing it with an elastic band.

 

BOHO BRAIDS

  1. Pick up a small section of hair a few inches back from your hairline and three-strand braid it, securing the ends with a hair tie.
  2. Next, an inch back from the first braid, French braid a larger section of hair and secure with an elastic band, letting it hang loosely.
  3. Finally, take all your hair (including the braids), split it in half, and rope braid everything together, tying off the ends with an elastic.

 

LOBSTER TAIL BRAIDS

  1. Grab a section of hair from the nape of your neck and braid it (secure the ends with an elastic), leaving the rest of your hair hanging loosely over your opposite shoulder.
  2. Then, take the remaining hair and wrap it under and over your braid, creating a coiled, piecey effect, until you’ve reached the hair tie.
  3. Tuck the wrapped hair into the elastic and voilà! Lobster tail braid.

 

UPSIDE-DOWN FRENCH BRAID BUNS

  1. Flip your head over and French-braid from the nape of your neck to just below the crown of your head.
  2. Secure the braid with a hair tie, then wrap the hair around the base of the elastic and pin it into place. Boom: a gorgeous, unconventional bun.

 

DUTCH BRAID PIG TAILS

  1. Part your hair down the center of your head, then clip one section up and out of the way.
  2. With your loose hair, create a Dutch braid from your hairline down to the nape of your neck, securing with an elastic. Repeat on the other side.
  3. Cover the elastics by wrapping a piece of hair around each hair tie, sliding a bobby pin through the elastic to keep it in place.

 

SKELETON BRAIDS

  1. Section off a three-inch strip of hair down the center of your head (use clips to hold the side of your hair down and out of the way).
  2. Dutch-braid the strip until you reach just below the crown of your head, tying off the braid with an elastic.
  3. Unclip the sides of your hair and braid them on top of your already braided strip, partially covering the braid so it peeks through.
  4. Incorporate the rest of your hair and three-strand braid it until you reach the ends. Secure with an elastic.

 

 

Ref: www.cosmopolitan.com

 

How To Tell If Your Scalp Is Healthy

Healthy hair starts at the root, and that includes giving VIP treatment to our largest organ: skin. A nourished scalp means happy skin and healthier, faster growing strands. So how can you tell if your scalp is healthy?

The Ideal Scalp pH Level

Our skin’s pH level is between the range of 4.2 to 6.5 . Most women show greater variation in pH to men. A pH level of 2 is very acidic and a level of 12 is very alkaline. A good shampoo will be balanced at 5.5 pH, the ideal level for the scalp. A healthy scalp means healthy hair, and that is a barometer to your overall health. If your hair is limp, dry, not growing, or falling out there is something going on with your health.

Symptoms of an Unhealthy Scalp

When you’re feeling like your hair is falling out, your scalp is itchy, your hair texture has changed, your scalp is always oily, or you cannot control the flakiness, it’s time to see a trichologist. A huge misconception is that a dry scalp is the cause of flakes or itching but in fact this common condition is often seen in people with oily skin and scalp. You’ll know when it’s time to see a trichologist if you can’t go without washing your hair every day, and by the end of the day your hair looks lanky and is stuck to the head. This is caused by over-active sebaceous glands, known as Seborroeic Dermatitis. Seborroeic Dermatitis can be corrected by the use of a scalp balancing mask, although it may be the cause of a hormonal imbalance. So, your first stop is a trichologist then an OBGYN. Seborroeic Dermatitis as well as scalp psoriasis, an uncomfortable itching or burning sensation, are conditions that often need medication to treat, but a change in diet can be helpful in combating the effects.

Causes

Wearing the same hat too often, stress, diet, hormones and not shampooing your scalp enough are all causes of an itchy, flaky, or irritated scalp. Shower water temperature does not affect the pH of your scalp. If the temperature is too hot, however, it can be harmful and if too cold, might not clean the hair well.

If you’re using lots of hair and scalp products, like dry shampoo, colored powder, heavy oil, and leaving them to build up for a week or more then you’re running the risk of your follicles getting so clogged up that a nasty skin reaction on the scalp will form. In extreme cases, the hair will start to fall out. This is why it’s very important to keep your scalp healthy. Avoid any harsh soaps that leave hair feeling dry and formulas that contain silicones as they coat the hair shaft and over time lead to product build up.

When the scalp feels tight and sore, the style you’re wearing—a tight pony tail, tight extra-long braids, extra-long hair extensions—can be to blame. To make the problem go away stop doing all of above, and see how your scalp feeling in a few days’ time. If your scalp reaction isn’t the cause of color/bleach or a shampoo then it’s time to see a trichologist to determine what the underlining problem is.

Solutions to a Healthy Scalp

While it’s very rare that a flaky scalp will cause hair loss, if there is excessive itchiness and flakiness that is left untreated, it can lead to hair loss in extreme conditions. When you notice that your head is itchy for a few days, change your shampoo right away. Shampoo your scalp very well with a medicated shampoo. If this does not correct the problem then book an appointment with a trichologist to get a professional opinion.

As for shampooing correctly, it’s important to thoroughly wet your hair as it will allow you to use less shampoo. Using warm water, run your fingers through your hair as the water is flowing over it, then pour a quarter-size shampoo into the palm of your hand, rub hands together to get product all over hands then place both hands onto your wet scalp and hair. Massage the shampoo well into the scalp then rinse and repeat if necessary. I know many like the feeling, but it’s not a good idea to scratch the scalp with your fingernails as it can cause irritation. Instead, massage the scalp with your fingertips. Small circler movements will do the trick.

The brushes you use can also affect the health of your scalp. The round brushes are very light to handle and made with natural boar bristles. These are by far the very best to blow your hair out with as they do not rip the hair, and add a wonderful shine.

 

 

 

Ref: www.theouai.com